Linked by Eugenia Loli on Sat 17th Mar 2007 00:26 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu During my 8 years of Linux on and off usage I have tried more distros than I have chocolate bars. Each one of my previous encounters meant that I had to spend at least 2 days configuring before I have a desktop that I was somewhat comfortable with. With Ubuntu Feisty Fawn's latest test beta --for the first time ever-- this was not the case. I was up and running with all the niceties I wanted within 2 hours.
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Coxy
Member since:
2006-07-01

Adobe won't ever release their apps on Linux, at least I don't believe so.

Why? It's because they know hardly anyone would buy it. Many poeople may tell Adobe they would want to USE Photoshop on Linux, but how many people would actually BUY Photoshop if it was released for Linux? People who use Linux, where everything is free, would just crack a trial version and be knowledgeable enough to stop any product activation from 'phoning home'. Adobe know this... so does every other large software co. that won't release Linux versions.

Businesses won't pay for it... they already purchased Macs for their design departments or have the Windows versions. I don't believe there could be very many 'businesses' for Adobe to target on Linux, certainly not enough to make it worth the development costs.

Edited 2007-03-17 10:57

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Adobe on Linux
by ubit on Sat 17th Mar 2007 11:06 in reply to "RE[5]: Ubuntu is missing too much stuff..."
ubit Member since:
2006-09-08

http://www.adobeforums.com/cgi-bin/webx?13@@.3bc1d4af/0

"Chris Cox:
Is the time approaching when Linux has standards for fonts, color management, printing, etc.?

Is the time approaching when Linux has standard APIs beyond POSIX? (in other words: Linux is just the kernel, it's all the other stuff that makes it useful. But all that other stuff varies from distribution to distribution.)

Is the time approaching when Linux has standards for a GUI? (anything based on X WIndows does not qualify... Been there, bought the T-shirt, still got the books, but ain't goin back)

Is the time approaching when Linux has real desktop applications and not just command line apps, one-off ports and server products?

And most importantly: is the time approaching when Linux desktop users are willing to pay for commercial software?

Let me know when you have a serious answer.
"

I'm not sure about the argument that people don't pay for Linux, considering Red Hat/Oracle(proprietary)/Suse/IBM(proprietary). Honestly it seems to me like a red herring. I know most students already pirate Photoshop anyways.

Edited 2007-03-17 11:08

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: Adobe on Linux
by chris_dk on Sat 17th Mar 2007 15:34 in reply to "RE[6]: Adobe on Linux"
chris_dk Member since:
2005-07-12

Actually, that thread pretty good shows why Adobe doesn't port Photoshop to Linux:

* Lack of standardisation and good APIs
* Lack of market

I am a pro-Linux, but I see a lot of limitations in the platform as well.

I think that it will take a least 5 years until Linux has matured enough to port something like Photoshop.

Reply Parent Score: 2

rtfa Member since:
2006-02-27

"People who use Linux, where everything is free, would just crack a trial version and be knowledgeable enough to stop any product activation from 'phoning home'."

this is a Microsoft windows issue - The only pirated software is Windows Based software done by Windows users who don't want to pay for Photoshop etc. The biggest music pirating is done by Windows users.

Stop spreading blatent lies about Linux users, the FREE part means freedom and it happens in most case that the software is free in cost as well.

I know loads of Windows users using the "free" versions of software such as AVG so who are the freeloaders then?????

Reply Parent Score: 1

udi7 Member since:
2007-03-18

People who use Linux, where everything is free, would just crack a trial version and be knowledgeable enough to stop any product activation from 'phoning home'.

Hahaha, are you really that naive? People who use Windows do it all the time. I can assure you that the majority of the software installed in PCs with Windows in the world is pirated. And that "People who use Linux" thing is really hilarious. I think people who currently use Linux don't need Photoshop. Otherwise they wouldn't be Linux users, would they? So, we can say that most designers are Windows or OSX users. Some of them would be willing to switch to Linux if Adobe ported Photoshop. If those designers are honest people who choose to buy original software (even thought getting a cracked version is the easiest thing in the world) they will keep doing it in Linux. Honesty is not determined by the OS you use, is it?

Reply Parent Score: 3

pcdoctor Member since:
2007-03-05

You're quite right in that many Windoze users pirate software. To the max.
Even my version of eXPee is a pirated hacked copy
(and it works well, and takes Auto-Updates!)
My Photoshop is a pirated version...I don't usually pay for Windows software (maybe once or twice,avoiding such whenever possible) - my AVG is free, as are all other diagnostix...in fact I make a small living outa making house calls to my PC friends, (pre-loaded with PC freeware that I don't pay one cent for) and everything works.
Bill Gates is yet to get one single red cent outa my pocket and it's been six years,now!

Yours Truly,
Pirates of The Caribbean!
________________________________________________

Reply Parent Score: 3

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

{People who use Linux, where everything is free, would just crack a trial version and be knowledgeable enough to stop any product activation from 'phoning home'.}

<sarcasm>
You know, you are 100% correct.

After all, as an example, Linux Genuine Advantage ...
http://www.linuxgenuineadvantage.org/
... has already been cracked!
http://www.alienos.com/articles/2007/02/02/linux-genuine-advantage-...

</sarcasm>

{ Adobe know this... so does every other large software co. that won't release Linux versions. }

So what about the large software companies that do release Linux versions of proprietary applications? Including, BTW, the largest such company, IBM?

Seriously, it won't be long before Adobe lose any opportunity to establish a market for Photoshop on the Linux platform, as Krita in KOffice 2.0 under KDE4 (which will be available on Windows as well as Linux) catches up then passes it by.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krita
http://www.koffice.org/krita/

Edited 2007-03-18 10:16

Reply Parent Score: 2