Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 23rd Mar 2007 17:50 UTC, submitted by Charles A Landemaine
PC-BSD PC-BSD announced that it will deliver Opera in the next version of PC-BSD. Opera will be "one less thing you need to download after installation", as Matt Olander, CTO of iXsystems puts it, to get "a more usable system" out of your PC-BSD box.
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RE: Bad
by deathshadow on Fri 23rd Mar 2007 22:04 UTC in reply to "Bad"
deathshadow
Member since:
2005-07-12

>> I don't want Opera. I want Firefox.

Funny, I'm the exact opposite, finding firefox buggy, bloated, buggy, slow, buggy, and even 2.0 still has that wonderful memory 'feature' (mostly in the stupid download manager - let's route EVERYTHING through the download manager, even images and files that are already in the cache, even redownloading them in some cases - RIGHT)

In fact, I'm not in the habit of supporting programs that try to pass a memory leak as a feature, or that has a support staff (bugzilla) who's best response to an error report is a two paragraph attack on saying 'crash' instead of 'hung' - a distinction I've not heard in three decades of computing.

---------------------------------

On topic - Good to see SOMEONE in the *nix world for whom this 'free as in freedom or nothing' (which is the opposite of freedom BTW) means exactly two things. ... and jack left town

But then, PC-BSD has always been a bit more pragmatic, willing to listen to REAL WORLD concerns and a good deal less naive/idealistic than the 'Free Software' nutjobs who've taken over the rest of the *nix community.

If nothing else, it's nice to see a *nix that you go "I want to run commercial software" and the people behind it go "Let's see what we can do to make it work" instead of having them rant and rave for an hour about how it's "evil" to do so, calling you a sellout, and only after you basically threaten their lives get a simple "Oh, just enable __________" from 'just another user'. (Yes Gentoo, I'm looking at you.)

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Bad
by binarycrusader on Sat 24th Mar 2007 03:11 in reply to "RE: Bad"
binarycrusader Member since:
2005-07-06

If nothing else, it's nice to see a *nix that you go "I want to run commercial software" and the people behind it go "Let's see what we can do to make it work" instead of having them rant and rave for an hour about how it's "evil" to do so, calling you a sellout, and only after you basically threaten their lives get a simple "Oh, just enable __________" from 'just another user'. (Yes Gentoo, I'm looking at you.)


Solaris has been like that for a while ;) I think at some point in the near future, OpenSolaris will be just as user-friendly as PCBSD, and just like PCBSD already has a great license.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Bad
by deathshadow on Sat 24th Mar 2007 08:34 in reply to "RE[2]: Bad"
deathshadow Member since:
2005-07-12

>> Solaris has been like that for a while

True, but Solaris (formerly sunOS) harkens back well before Linux was a twinkle in Linus' eye, and when everyone still thought of Stallman as 'that nutjob who wants to give it all away' assuming they even heard of him instead of the psuedo-religious messiah he is now...

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Bad
by kaiwai on Sat 24th Mar 2007 11:20 in reply to "RE[2]: Bad"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Solaris has been like that for a while ;) I think at some point in the near future, OpenSolaris will be just as user-friendly as PCBSD, and just like PCBSD already has a great license.

IMHO OpenSolaris is already for the desktop; I'm running SX:CE Build 60 and from my experience for the last couple of days IMHO it is very much ready.

As for commercial applications; ultimately, one can make as much noise to these companies as one wants, but at the end of the day, if the commercial companies are narrow minded enough not to port their applications to the said operating system, it isn't the fault of the operating system vendor.

What it should be, however, is a catalyst for the opensource community to rally around and create an opensource version of that application.

Reply Parent Score: 2