Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 30th Mar 2007 20:44 UTC, submitted by theosib
Linux The founder of the Open Graphics Project writes: "Good design and usability are very important. I haven't paid enough attention to the discussions between Linus and GNOME developers, so I can't address it directly. But what I can say is that a learning curve is not a bad thing. While it's good to think about the total novice, it's even more important to have consistent and logical mechanisms. This way, if someone has to learn something new to use the computer, they have to learn it only once. This is why I think it's good that Apple and Microsoft have UI development guides that encourage developers to make their apps act consistently with other apps in areas where their functionalities conceptually overlap. And this is where I start to get disappointed with GNU/X11/Linux systems."
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RE[3]: Application files
by reduz on Fri 30th Mar 2007 21:20 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Application files"
reduz
Member since:
2006-02-25

That beats the point of this article. You have to manually get the libraries/dependences/developmen files, and that's not easy to use, and a reason it lags behind.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Application files
by Doc Pain on Fri 30th Mar 2007 21:36 in reply to "RE[3]: Application files"
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

"That beats the point of this article. You have to manually get the libraries/dependences/developmen files, and that's not easy to use, and a reason it lags behind."

You're right, of course. I didn't talk about how complicated it is and / or might get, I did talk about that it's possible nearly everywhere. It works fine for small programs, but if you get into "dependency hell", you're nearly lost. So you will have to be educated enough to know how to solve these programs and how to read Makefile. So this solution is mostly designed for experienced users that don't mind to get their hands dirty. It's no solution for Joe Q. Sixpack and Jane Foobar. :-)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Application files
by dagw on Fri 30th Mar 2007 22:33 in reply to "RE[3]: Application files"
dagw Member since:
2005-07-06

And how this that different from OS X or Windows or any other OS. If it want to run an open source app on windows and no one has made an installer I have to compile from source, same with OS X and every other OS.

At least Linux tries to make this annoying experience marginally less painful.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[5]: Application files
by mmebane on Sat 31st Mar 2007 19:34 in reply to "RE[4]: Application files"
mmebane Member since:
2005-07-06

Or I just find a binary somewhere, unzip it somewhere, ctrl-shift-drag a shortcut onto my Start menu, and be done with it.

I find that usually SOMEBODY will be building Windows binaries for things, even if the project only supplies Windows source.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Application files
by aquila_deus on Sat 31st Mar 2007 02:31 in reply to "RE[3]: Application files"
aquila_deus Member since:
2005-10-02

That part is automatic done by package manager. Besides the one place thing is completely crap - how can it manage dependencies? Every apps on windows just end up having a copy of all libs they use.

Internal file structures for apps should be hidden from the user and managed by the system (and not the apps/setup). No user should copy/move/remove apps by himself, or even do any stupid click/interaction during installation/uninstallation.

Reply Parent Score: 4