Linked by Eugenia Loli on Wed 4th Apr 2007 18:02 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems Geeks.com were once more very kind to send us one of their products for a review. Geeks sells cheap laptops --among others-- and so we asked for a low-cost laptop without an operating system in it for the purpose of this review. They sent us the IBM T23, (currently selling for just $299) and an extra 256 MB stick of RAM ($30). We tested the laptop with three different OSes, read on for more.
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RE[2]: T23
by renox on Wed 4th Apr 2007 18:46 UTC in reply to "RE: T23"
renox
Member since:
2005-07-06

>It even has a usable build in keyboard. Where are these useless "Windows" keys?

Why do you call the Windows keys useless?
I use them quite often:
Win+D to show the desktop (iconifying all the windows)
Win+L to lock your PC
And more rarely:
Win+R to run a command

Too bad, Linux distribs, by default, doesn't use the same shortcut keys..

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: T23
by Laurence on Wed 4th Apr 2007 18:56 in reply to "RE[2]: T23"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

On a desktop the windows keys are fine, however on a laptop they just get in the way.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: T23
by Doc Pain on Wed 4th Apr 2007 19:23 in reply to "RE[2]: T23"
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

"Why do you call the Windows keys useless?"

Because they are, at least to the average user.

"I use them quite often:
Win+D to show the desktop (iconifying all the windows)
Win+L to lock your PC
And more rarely:
Win+R to run a command "


You're marking yourself as a quite professional "Windows" user because you know this. The L and D combination weren't even known to me. Tje average user uses the mouse more than the keyboard, and he usually avoids these keys.

"Too bad, Linux distribs, by default, doesn't use the same shortcut keys.."

Just have a look at the configuration dialog of your favourite desktop environment (KDE or Gnome) or the window manager of your choice, you can surely configure it this way. This should not be very hard to do. But I don't think KDE's or Gnome's developers will implement these functions by default.

At work, I use an Apple USB keyboard and have set some useful functions (using xmodmap and the XFCE configuration), at home I use a Sun USB keyboard where the many extra keys (just have a look at its layout in xkeycaps: Sun Microsystems Type 5), along with Compose and Meta. "Windows" users surely don't know what these are used for, so they usually call them useless. In my opinion, the "Windows" keys are useless because they don't to something by default or in general, they just consume the rare space on the keyboard (space bar), which is often a problem on small laptop keyboards if you feel more comfortable with a real keyboard. :-)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: T23
by flav2000 on Thu 5th Apr 2007 03:40 in reply to "RE[2]: T23"
flav2000 Member since:
2006-02-08

There are a couple Windows button shortcuts you missed:

Win+E to open a Windows Explorer window
and
Win+Break to open the System properties page.

I don't know about the Win+L myself though.

I agree with someone else though that most users won't know about this.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: T23
by l3v1 on Thu 5th Apr 2007 07:47 in reply to "RE[4]: T23"
l3v1 Member since:
2005-07-06

win+m minimize all, win+u utility man, not that i'd use them much ;)

but i can't really live without ctrl+shift+esc and win+l ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: T23
by renox on Fri 6th Apr 2007 08:38 in reply to "RE[4]: T23"
renox Member since:
2005-07-06

It's not that I missed them, it's that I don't use them: I have the explorer opened at startup, so I don't need Win+E.

I don't use 'System properties' often enough to remember Win+Break.

OTOH, I use 'Win+D' quite often.

Reply Parent Score: 2