Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 4th Apr 2007 21:07 UTC, submitted by jayson.knight
Windows "Hey Folks - this is Mike Reavey. We're all glad that MS07-017 - the Security Bulletin that fixes the vulnerability in Animated Cursor Handling - has been released, helping to block attacks on that vulnerability. While we released it within 5 days of being notified of attacks, we have received questions from customers about why it took us 3 months to develop and release the fix for this vulnerability. I wanted to provide some insight into the history of this vulnerability, and while doing so, hopefully provide insight into the overall security update lifecycle, including testing, which consumes the greatest amount of time."
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RE: Core of the OS?
by WinstonEwert on Thu 5th Apr 2007 02:08 UTC in reply to "Core of the OS?"
WinstonEwert
Member since:
2005-07-06

Keep in mind that without actually knowing the design in more detail and understanding motivations behind it, its very difficult to be an accurate judge.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Core of the OS?
by eantoranz on Thu 5th Apr 2007 02:23 in reply to "RE: Core of the OS?"
eantoranz Member since:
2005-12-18

Keep in mind that without actually knowing the design in more detail and understanding motivations behind it, its very difficult to be an accurate judge.


Look.. the day I see Operating Systems: Design & Implementation books used in a respectable university come with a chapter dedicated to icon rendering (???), we'll talk about being an accurate judge. :-D

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Core of the OS?
by jayson.knight on Thu 5th Apr 2007 05:25 in reply to "RE[2]: Core of the OS?"
jayson.knight Member since:
2005-07-06

"Look.. the day I see Operating Systems: Design & Implementation books used in a respectable university come with a chapter dedicated to icon rendering (???)"

The day a university develops, releases, and maintains something as large and complex as Windows (or anything similar to the public domain), I'll let academia be the judge as to why MS chose to do things the way they did.

Like most other things in Windows that kind of make you go "WTF" it's gotta be related to backwards compatibility.

Reply Parent Score: 5