Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 4th Apr 2007 21:29 UTC
Zeta A lot of things have happened in the past few days concerning Zeta, BeOS, and Haiku. In order to create some order in the chaos, Eugenia and I have created a rough timeline of what happened the past 6-7 years. Read on for the timeline and some more thoughts on the matter. Update: Magnusoft ceases distribution of Zeta. Update II: Access answered the questions posed in the article.
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RE[6]: I'll tell you why...
by lucky13 on Thu 5th Apr 2007 17:16 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: I'll tell you why..."
lucky13
Member since:
2007-04-01

When Linux started out

BeOS isn't just starting out. Neither is Haiku.

Haiku will do the same

No, it won't. It will appeal to the same people BeOS appealed to.

won't happen in 2 years, but take something like 5 years to start being noticed

Meaning 2012, at which time people will be using Linux on cell phones and mobile devices without knowing a single thing about command lines or bash scripts.

Linux / Windows will lose users to Haiku

And pigs will fly and monkeys will fly out of all our...

Linux didn't offer much in the start either, it took a couple of years

We're not a "couple years" into the lifespan of BeOS and its open source offspring, we're a couple years past its relevance. There are very major differences in how each platform has developed. Linux was suited not only to immediate relevance (80836), but relevance that would extend beyond (Pentium) and into the future (scalability for use in mobile devices). Haiku has no such strategy. It's trying to recreate Be with an open source license. I don't have anything bad to say about that (read what I wrote on my blog -- I admire what they're doing). I just think it's creating its own obsolescence by tying itself to the desktop.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[7]: I'll tell you why...
by tonestone57 on Thu 5th Apr 2007 17:46 in reply to "RE[6]: I'll tell you why..."
tonestone57 Member since:
2005-12-31

BeOS isn't just starting out. Neither is Haiku.
BeOS was abandoned (dead!) in 2001; had it continued to today, then it would have been a different story. Haiku doesn't even have a release. The first Haiku release (R1) is when I consider an OS to make its first apperance. (Imagine me working on an OS for 10 years, but haven't finished it. Do you think anyone can or would use it?) As I see it, an OS isn't *ready* until the First Release (R1) *and* that is when it begins its *actual* life.

Yes, 5 years. Haiku has to catch up. It'll be usable from R1, but recognition / user adoption won't come till R2 or R3. RedHat 5 attracted many people to Linux, do you think RedHat 1, 2 or 3 were even noticed?

BeOS ceased in 2001, so how can you say it still exists today? It is like taking Windows 98 & comparing it to the current version of Linux in 2007 *and* then saying, look how great Linux is. Is that fair? Haiku doesn't even have R1 out and won't be able to compete with Linux till at about R3. (Comparing a *new* OS, Haiku, to one that has been around for many years, Linux is not fair. And Haiku is *new* because it is built from the ground up, with no BeOS source code to go on).

I agree that Linux is further ahead and has gained lots of momentum and support. Reason why Haiku is having trouble getting finished; tough to get developers, because they either go to Linux or Windows.

Haiku may just go for the Desktop and that will be good enough for me and many others. It *may* also go after the embedded market in the future and that would be even better. Who can say. It is *capable*, but who knows what will happen. Linux has a strong presence and it'll be tough to gain support on embedded devices.

Edited 2007-04-05 18:01

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: I'll tell you why...
by lucky13 on Thu 5th Apr 2007 19:29 in reply to "RE[7]: I'll tell you why..."
lucky13 Member since:
2007-04-01

BeOS was abandoned (dead!) in 2001; had it continued to today, then it would have been a different story.

Agh, such circular reasoning. Welcome to the real world. It's not a different story. It failed. Totally. You can make believe and play what "might have been" all you want, but it doesn't alter reality. And that reality is, BeOS and its imitations, clones, whatever you want to call them, are irrelevant.

BeOS ceased in 2001, so how can you say it still exists today?

It exists in the (now deceased, may it all RIP) attempts to recreate it atop Linux kernels, hacks of leaked code, "improved" versions like BeOS Max, Zeta, etc. And Haiku. How relevant did any of them become?

It is like taking Windows 98 & comparing it to the current version of Linux in 2007

No, it isn't.

I agree that Linux is further ahead and has gained lots of momentum and support. Reason why Haiku is having trouble getting finished; tough to get developers, because they either go to Linux or Windows.

I don't find your reasoning very convincing. Developers tend to go to where the real action is and where the real demand will be. That excludes BeOS, PhOS, Cosmoe, Zeta, and Haiku. How many of those are really relevant today?

Haiku may just go for the Desktop

Which will only assure its future irrelevance.

BTW, I mentioned your comments on my blog (I'm not going to keep linking it here, so find it up in the thread). I was almost as polite there as I've been here. I addressed this point there that I didn't in my previous reply:

What are you afraid of, that Linux will lose the battle? You like Linux so much, then stick with it and let the rest of us enjoy BeOS/Haiku.

Here's my response:
Well, I do use Linux for the most part. I also use OpenBSD and Windows XP (very rarely for work), and I have an old computer with NT Workstation that never gets used anymore. For a long time, I ran BeOS PE on this very computer and even added a BeOS partition to the NT computer. Iím not tied to any single operating system. Iím no fanboy, Iím no zealot. I have no fear of Linux ďlosingĒ anything, nor do I fear Haiku or any other OS ascending in usage. I just doubt thatís going to happen. (See below: Iíve heard this tired refrain for years. How long will you sing it while the rest of the world passes you by?)

Reply Parent Score: 1