Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 24th Aug 2005 20:45 UTC
Windows Microsoft officials have admitted one of their biggest challenges in continuing to grow the company's Windows business is the impression among some of its installed base that older Windows versions are good enough. The users of Windows 95, which turns ten years old on Wednesday, are a case in point. Elsewhere, here is a story about the launch of Windows 95 exactly 10 years ago.
Thread beginning with comment 22935
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
evert
Member since:
2005-07-06

The KDE menu editor is nice, but Win* does better. In UNIX, everything is a file, or should be. In KDE for UNIX, all menu entries are stored in a file. In Windows, each menu entry is a file (a shortcut). Windows sometimes follows the UNIX philosophy better than KDE.

And that is disappointing.

Apart from that, I like the KDE user interface much more than the Windows UI.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Member since:

Sorry, but you apparently don't understand what the 'Everything is a file" philosophy is about. It's not about how applications store their data, it's how system objects are accessed. System objects are supposed to follow the file semantic (open, seek, read, write, close) which then allows to present them in a filesystem tree and to browse and manipulate them with the standard Unix utilities. See /dev, /sys or /proc for example.

Moreover, menu entries are individual files following the Desktop Entry Spec :
http://www.freedesktop.org/Standards/desktop-entry-spec
and the layout of the menu is defined in a separate XML File :
http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Standards_2fmenu_2dspec

This separation between menu entries and the menu itself is actually a very good idea and a lot better than the Windows' way.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Member since:

In Windows, each menu entry is a file (a shortcut). Windows sometimes follows the UNIX philosophy better than KDE.

While it doesn't happen much in Windows, it happens just as rarely in KDE or Gnome.

* The KIO slaves with nifty urls don't map back to anything outside of KDE; if you type in the URL sftp://user@192.168.1.101 in Konqueror, df shows nothing and you can't go to any location on the local machine to pick up the mount point...unless it's a KDE app.

* If I plug in a flash drive, df shows it is mounted on /media/usbdrive ... and KDE shows it as /mnt/sda1 in the desktop icon.

I don't understand why there is such a disconnect between KDE and the OS when the OS+shell (in this case Linux and Bash) does such a good job of handling files and resources properly.

Reply Parent Score: 0

Member since:

{* The KIO slaves with nifty urls don't map back to anything outside of KDE; if you type in the URL sftp://user@192.168.1.101 in Konqueror, df shows nothing and you can't go to any location on the local machine to pick up the mount point...unless it's a KDE app. }

That sounds like an fstab problem... you're mounting it in KDE and thus the df won't display it as a mount.

{* If I plug in a flash drive, df shows it is mounted on /media/usbdrive ... and KDE shows it as /mnt/sda1 in the desktop icon. }

sounds like an fstab problem again, I've not experienced this issue.

{I don't understand why there is such a disconnect between KDE and the OS when the OS+shell (in this case Linux and Bash) does such a good job of handling files and resources properly.}

one of the many things that needs to be worked on, but part of the reason is the differing file structures even among linux distros makes the X desktops, less dependant on the under structure, and forces them to create their own structure... which is why if you don't have you're memory card specifically mapped in fstab it will show up as two locations. Really distros should do this automagically.. Ubuntu by default has no fstab entries for other drives in your computer or possible memory card mounts.



----> to the guy that was complaining about not being able to drag menu entries around, I find this "feature" annoying as it's too easy for those with mouse clicking problems to drag things into folders and then complain that they can't find them.

Reply Parent Score: 0