Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 10th Apr 2007 22:00 UTC, submitted by michuk
Graphics, User Interfaces "Red Hat has recently shared with the world the first ISO images of the system that is supposed to be installed on the OLPC laptops. I suddenly felt an irresistible temptation. I downloaded 291 MB ISO, burned it on a CD and started testing. Here is what I got."
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RE[5]: Hehehe...
by archiesteel on Wed 11th Apr 2007 23:06 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Hehehe..."
archiesteel
Member since:
2005-07-02

I disagree. Learning an interface will not prevent you from learning another one, or even put you at a disadvantage when you do.

Case in point: computer games. They all have different interfaces - some quite complex - and yet people (kids, especially) navigate them without too much effort.

In any case, at the risk of repeating myself, computer skills are *not* the primary focus of the OLPC.

Here's a novel idea: why don't we wait until the project is actually launched and tried out before saying it's a failure, hmm?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[6]: Hehehe...
by BluenoseJake on Thu 12th Apr 2007 04:31 in reply to "RE[5]: Hehehe..."
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

I never said it was a failure, I said that the UI is a mistake. I may be proven wrong. I may be proven right.

It is not when these children are growing up that the OLPC interface will be the problem, it is after they are grown up, and thrust into say, a university environment and all the other kids have used Windows/OS X/KDE/Gnome all their lives, they will have to take the time to learn the more complex and richer interfaces. This will distract from the task at hand, education. if the OLPC is the only computer a student has used, they will be at a disadvantage.

For 6 years I worked at a university in IT. We had an institute that had students from developing countries come and stay for a year at a time for various development, social, community and infrastructure building/planning curriculum. Most had trouble adjusting to the more advanced technology at their disposal in Canada. Most of them had used computers before, but the changes in interfaces and functionality led to some very big hurdles for them to overcome.

I don't speak out of my ass on this particular topic, I have seen it first hand. All most all of the students caught up sooner or later, but they struggled with it. And these students were not competing for grades, scholarships or co-op placements. The same thing can happen here, and I believe it will

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: Hehehe...
by archiesteel on Thu 12th Apr 2007 04:47 in reply to "RE[6]: Hehehe..."
archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

This will distract from the task at hand, education. if the OLPC is the only computer a student has used, they will be at a disadvantage.
(...)
Most had trouble adjusting to the more advanced technology at their disposal in Canada. Most of them had used computers before, but the changes in interfaces and functionality led to some very big hurdles for them to overcome.


This is where we disagree...I think it's still better to have used the OLPC with Sugar than no computer at all.

You say that students from developing countries had trouble adjusting to the more advanced technologies, but that doesn't mean that those who had used other UIs (which would have to be DOS or Windows 3.x to represent a major difference) were at a disadvantage compared to those who had *never* used a computer.

I guess we'll have to wait and see. I disagreed with the UI at first, but I now I think it can prove to be rather useful (not unlike the UI of a palmtop PC).

Reply Parent Score: 2