Linked by Eugenia Loli on Sun 22nd Apr 2007 07:38 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu "Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn) arrived just a few days ago with promises of better hardware compatibility, included proprietary software and drivers, and more user friendliness. Was it wort the wait? And more importantly - Is it finally time to "Make the Switch"?" Read the review here. Elsewhere, "First thoughts on Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn" was published at ZDNet. Update: A reply article to the two linked above.
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RE: Sudo
by penguin7009 on Sun 22nd Apr 2007 23:33 UTC
penguin7009
Member since:
2005-07-10

Sorry if I got a flame war started. AFIK the reason the "root" account was disabled was to prevent new users moving to Linux from destroying their OS?

While this might be a good thing, wouldn't it be better to keep Linux Systems the same as far as the structure of the file systems and teach users HOW to use them properly.

Linux is a great Operating System and getting better all the time. Changes are bound to happen as it progresses and Ubuntu/Kubuntu et al are very good distros.

However, there are already mulitiple differences in Linux in general and doesn't this Sudo thing just add another fragmentation to the mix?

Now Parallels and other devs are going to have to deal with new uneeded file system structures and names in addition to .rpm/.deb/targz etc. Seems counterproductive?

penguin7009

Reply Score: 1

RE[2]: Sudo
by Kokopelli on Mon 23rd Apr 2007 03:16 in reply to "RE: Sudo"
Kokopelli Member since:
2005-07-06

Sorry if I got a flame war started. AFIK the reason the "root" account was disabled was to prevent new users moving to Linux from destroying their OS?


It wouldn't be the internet if there wasn't a fire roasting somewhere. ;)

sudo was originally created for BSD on VAX in the 80's, making the sudo command predate Linux by a good bit.

The purpose of sudo is to help provide accountability as well as a certain measure of security for commands which must run as root. It provides and audit of the commands used as well as having the ability to restrict what commands a user can perform. It was not created to protect the users from themselves so much as to allow administration of large multiuser systems in such a way that an administrator did not have to have full root access to perform his duties.

sudo is available on Solaris, OS X, BSD, Linux, and AIX at a minimum. Not too sure on other platforms. So you see, the availability and use of sudo is hardly out of the ordinary for *nix. It is just not as common in the Linux world.

Reply Parent Score: 1