Linked by Eugenia Loli on Thu 26th Apr 2007 20:35 UTC, submitted by Valour
Mandriva, Mandrake, Lycoris "After making a lot of progress with Mandriva Linux 2007, I thought perhaps Mandriva had turned over a new leaf, and was using that release as a starting point for an overall better quality operating environment. I was totally wrong. Both the PowerPack Edition and Discovery/LX have slid so far back with version 2007.1 that I have serious doubts as to the future of Mandriva's viability as a commercial desktop operating system." Read more at SoftwareInReview.
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RE[2]: Interesting
by Xaero_Vincent on Thu 26th Apr 2007 22:03 UTC in reply to "RE: Interesting"
Xaero_Vincent
Member since:
2006-08-18

Ditto Box,

I want the peace of mind that comes with running legal Linux software in the United States. Technically, any other way is illegal in the USA and several other countries.

Think of it this way:

What chance does Linux or any other Unix OS (besides OS X) have at gaining widespread acceptance if basic things like watching DVDs or listening/watching to music/video in WMA/V, MPEG2, etc. formats cannot be or arn't done legally?

The DMCA act, MPAA, so on would put their foot down very quickly. Patent lawsuits could follow and affect users.

It could get very ugly fast if Linux was in any dominate position on the desktop.

Edited 2007-04-26 22:07

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Interesting
by Xaero_Vincent on Thu 26th Apr 2007 22:15 in reply to "RE[2]: Interesting"
Xaero_Vincent Member since:
2006-08-18

Besides,

$39.90 USD for Mandriva Discovery and ~$38.10 USD for the Fluendo "All" codecs totals $78.

Just $78 to be legal and a great way to establish credit on my first credit card. ;-)

Plus I believe I remember seing Mandriva having Cedega and Anti-Virus software as well. So thats an extra bonus to import into your favorate distro.

Edited 2007-04-26 22:17

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Interesting
by raver31 on Thu 26th Apr 2007 23:26 in reply to "RE[3]: Interesting"
raver31 Member since:
2005-07-06

While I agree with your reasoning, I am unsure if the codec packs actually are transferable from one distro to another.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Interesting
by segedunum on Fri 27th Apr 2007 00:22 in reply to "RE[2]: Interesting"
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

I want the peace of mind that comes with running legal Linux software in the United States. Technically, any other way is illegal in the USA and several other countries.

Given that the vast majority of the functionality of the software you are talking about is allegedly covered by patents which have not been legally tested or proven in any shape or form, this is a massive step of the imagination.

if basic things like watching DVDs or listening/watching to music/video in WMA/V, MPEG2, etc. formats cannot be or arn't done legally?

Assuming that what is being done now is illegal is a big stretch.

Patent lawsuits could follow and affect users.

That would be unlikely. Lawsuits against users would be messy, expensive and unenforceable, and it would mean that the basis for them would need to be proved.

It could get very ugly fast if Linux was in any dominate position on the desktop.

There is simply no way of avoiding that, and by then it would be too late anyway. If someone cannot write some software that is free of any question marks on it being freely distributable then it needs to be faced head on. Shying away from it will not help desktop Linux.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Interesting
by Soulbender on Fri 27th Apr 2007 03:01 in reply to "RE[2]: Interesting"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

"What chance does Linux or any other Unix OS (besides OS X) have at gaining widespread acceptance if basic things like watching DVDs or listening/watching to music/video in WMA/V, MPEG2, etc. formats cannot be or arn't done legally? "

Presuming it even IS illegal in the U.S it does not affect Linux uptake in other countries.

"Patent lawsuits could follow and affect users."

Users can't be sued for patent infringement since users aren't infringing on patents, the manufacturer of the product is. Patent infringement does not apply to purchase and usage but to manufacturing and possibly sale.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Interesting
by Xaero_Vincent on Fri 27th Apr 2007 04:06 in reply to "RE[3]: Interesting"
Xaero_Vincent Member since:
2006-08-18

Using libdvdcss2 is illegal in the USA because it isn't a properly license CSS decoder. Plus it sucks and wont play some DVDs with new encryption schemes. Many new Sony DVDs movies are like this.

Since I live in the U.S. it affects me. While its unlikely I'll be arrested at my home, its still not legal.

Might as well just pirate movies from torrent sites. Thats illegal too but I'm unlikely to be caught, right? ;-)

Your right. Users probably wouldnt be sued but they can force the distributor to halt sales/pay large settlements that would inadvertently affect users.

Anyway... why has LinDVD been ommited from 2007.1? The guy even mentions this issue in his review/rant. I guess I'll just buy 2007.0 Discovery.

I know I can use the RPMs on Fedora.

Edited 2007-04-27 04:09

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Interesting
by porcel on Fri 27th Apr 2007 12:28 in reply to "RE[2]: Interesting"
porcel Member since:
2006-01-28

Software patents are ugly.

But you should know that patent infringement cases are brought against the producers of a product, not its users.

If Toshiba has a problem with Ford, it sues Ford Inc, not Ford drivers.

So for the love of God, stop putting fear into people's minds because they might want to have multimedia support on their linux stations.

Of course, long time linux users such as myself have our music collections as ogg vorbis and don't have to face any of these issues, but let people get to make up their minds about these things their own pace.

Reply Parent Score: 2