Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 30th Apr 2007 22:27 UTC, submitted by editingwhiz
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu "Officially, Dell hasn't said a word yet about which Linux it will be preloading on its desktops and laptops. Several sources within Dell, however, have told DesktopLinux.com that Dell's desktop Linux pick is going to be Ubuntu. While unable to confirm this through official Dell channels, we have heard the same story now from several internal Dell sources. They tell us that the computer giant will be preinstalling the newly released Ubuntu 7.04. These systems will be released in late May 2007."
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rm6990
Member since:
2005-07-04

Think of what this will do for Ubuntu visibility... wow!


1) This product will NEVER make it onto Dell's front-page, and they will likely never advertise it on TV. This is being done to please existing customers who already use Linux (or to attract non-customers that use Linux), NOT to widely promote Linux as an alternative to Windows.

2) At best, it will be an additional option on SOME desktops, and the vast majority of users will ignore it and choose Windows.

3) It WILL cost more, guaranteed. This is because Dell receives kickbacks for the crapware they bundle on their PCs, which won't be happening on Linux anytime soon. So it won't even be available as a cheaper option for people who want to buy it, wipe it and install a pirated Windows. And no one is going to pay more for an OS they have never heard of before that won't run all the software they already own and know how to use.

Being realistic, Dell is doing this to please a small minority of their customers, and will do little to nothing to actually promote it to Joe Blow. As much as I want to see Linux succeed, I don't see this as being the major development a lot of people seem to think it is. I see it as primarily a publicity stunt.

Call me when, on computers that offer both Windows and Ubuntu, you see "Dell recommends Ubuntu Linux" or w/e. The only alternative OS I could see Dell pushing as a major alternative to Windows is Mac OS X, and the day when Apple licenses it to Dell is the day hell freezes over.

Reply Parent Score: 3

rm6990 Member since:
2005-07-04

[sarcasm] Gee, the moderation system on this site is clearly working. Obviously my comment was trolling and my points have no basis in-fact whatsoever. I clearly deserved to be moderated down. [/sarcasm]

[cluebat] I regularily mod up people I disagree with if they have good points, and mod down people I do agree with if they are trolling or whatever. The mod system wasn't put in place to mod down people you don't agree with![/cluebat]

Reply Parent Score: 1

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

"""
I clearly deserved to be moderated down
"""

Hey Ryan,

Don't worry overly. I find that sometimes some of my comments are modded down quickly. People who mod down for bad reasons tend to be pretty quick on the trigger. But give it a bit of time, and that majority of people who are fair and reasonable will usually correct the situation. Not always. But usually.

If you feel that you were moderated down unfairly, don't give the bastards that did it the satisfaction of knowing that you care. ;-)

Reply Parent Score: 3

apoclypse Member since:
2007-02-17

The great thing about Ubuntu is that it doesn't need to be advertised. The Logo is easily recognizable, the slogan is easy to remember. They name the dev versions of the distro something catchy, and funny. The advertising and marketing behind Ubuntu is word of mouth. People are generally excited about the distro. How can Dell not try to tap into that. If Canonical works closely with Dell maybe we can have a more thoroughly tested release. The issue with Ubuntu is that its not as large as RedHat or Suse, they have a team of about 40 and usually run out of time every release. Things get deferred a lot in each release. Hopefully, they will get more developers. I also think that Ubuntu is different enough in terms of culture, that Dell wants to try something new.

I will personally purchase a laptop from them with ubuntu. I just wish they would have better designs on them. I like more sleek looking hardware and there stuff is pretty bulky. I'm more worried about the very short upgrade intervals. Maybe a yearly release will instead of a bi-yearly release at least with official releases with the second release being more an update and bug hunt release.

Reply Parent Score: 3

rm6990 Member since:
2005-07-04

The great thing about Ubuntu is that it doesn't need to be advertised. The Logo is easily recognizable, the slogan is easy to remember. They name the dev versions of the distro something catchy, and funny. The advertising and marketing behind Ubuntu is word of mouth. People are generally excited about the distro. How can Dell not try to tap into that.


Step out of your geek-verse for a second and walk up to 20 random people on the street (unless you live in Silicon Valley of course :-P), show them the Ubuntu logo, and ask if they know what it is. You'll be lucky to get a single yes. When I mention advertising, I'm talking about advertising to the 99.5% of people that don't read sites like OSNews and Slashdot, and who also think Linux is a laundry detergent. Dell has 2 choices:

1) Don't advertise, and target that very small percentage of people who are familiar with Linux and Ubuntu and would be interested in their product. If this happens (which is very likely), then, like I said, they are simply doing this to please a small subset of customers.

2) Advertise to Joe User, and I simply don't see this happening. Too many support issues and customers that are pissed off when they buy a program at the store and it doesn't work. Apple has stores dedicated to selling hardware and software specifically for Macs, and I've still seen this exact same thing happen with Mac using friends. In my home city, I don't know of a single store that specializes in Linux that sells consumer level Linux software. F/OSS is lacking in some essential areas (I'm a big Apple supporter, and I'll concede Apple is lacking in some of these areas as well), such as tax software, CAD software, Photoshop, etc etc.

Reply Parent Score: 5

SEJeff Member since:
2005-11-05

I'm more worried about the very short upgrade intervals. Maybe a yearly release will instead of a bi-yearly release at least with official releases with the second release being more an update and bug hunt release.
This is what the LTS (Long Term Support) releases are for. Feisty was just released and Gutsy will be the next one. I read somewhere that the next LTS Ubuntu release will likely be Gutsy+1.

Reply Parent Score: 3

ubit Member since:
2006-09-08

"I'm more worried about the very short upgrade intervals. Maybe a yearly release will instead of a bi-yearly release at least with official releases with the second release being more an update and bug hunt release."

I agree with you..I know the timing is very important in order to 'combat' Vista and Leopard and get Ubuntu out to market, however the LTS thing is an issue that so many Linux distros face-- either use an old version of GNOME like Red Hat and Debian etch do, or have really nice features like Feisty Fawn has, and have a few more bugs. Then you have to upgrade. But in any case, Feisty Fawn will be supported for 18 months so hopefully the upgrade process will be more tested; people don't have to upgrade right away (in fact I'd be surprised if Dell doesn't have their own repositories to holds back upgades until tested)

Reply Parent Score: 2