Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 2nd May 2007 19:19 UTC, submitted by DevL
Apple Steve Jobs writes about Apple's efforts to become a more enironmental friendly company. "Apple has been criticized by some environmental organizations for not being a leader in removing toxic chemicals from its new products, and for not aggressively or properly recycling its old products. Upon investigating Apple's current practices and progress towards these goals, I was surprised to learn that in many cases Apple is ahead of, or will soon be ahead of, most of its competitors in these areas. Whatever other improvements we need to make, it is certainly clear that we have failed to communicate the things that we are doing well." Among other things, Apple will introduce LEDs in displays to Macs this year.
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Oh, and let's not forget...
by Luposian on Thu 3rd May 2007 00:19 UTC
Luposian
Member since:
2005-07-27

What do we do with the Nuclear WASTE, when it's spent, to provide us our electricity...

No, if we want to do things right, here in America (as well as abroad), we need to do the following:

1) Ride bikes (I'm 38 and never learned to drive... I think it's paying off now, especially in savings of money towards gas as well as pollution)

2) Walk when it's a short enough distance (or even the full distance you'd ride on a bike, if you're feeling particularly adventurous and energetic). Here in Sierra Vista, AZ we have a main street called Fry Blvd. and my brother and I walked all the way from 7th St. & Fry, to 92nd & Fry (to where WalMart is). Other than my feet hurting like crazy later, it was a great walk and fun!

3) Install solar panels, florescent lighting, and solar lighting (those sunlight refractor things; we have two of them in our house) and possibly a small windmill in your back yard. Attach the solar panels and windmill to a battery bank.

4) Wear warm clothing in winter instead of turning your thermostat up. Bundle up at night under lots of covers.

5) Stop water leaks. Plug up air gaps. Insulate your house. Only turn lights on when you need them. Only open the fridge/freezer when you NEED something (don't browse). Use drip tubing for watering plants. Buy live houseplants to add more oxygen to your household air. And...

6) Build a recumbant electricity-generating bicycle, that you can pedal while watching TV or using your computer...

You know, things like this, really do add up after awhile...

But how many of us can do it long term?

Edited 2007-05-03 00:22

Reply Score: 2

RE: Oh, and let's not forget...
by fsckit on Thu 3rd May 2007 03:05 in reply to "Oh, and let's not forget..."
fsckit Member since:
2006-09-24

Well I hate to interrupt here with some reality, but some of us have to go to work. If we want to keep our jobs we also have to be there on time, every time. Vehicles are a necessity. But hey, I'm willing to give this newfangled hippie walk-everywhere thing a chance. Just convince my 2 and 3 year old daughters and my wife that we all have to walk 12 miles, one way to the grocery store this weekend and 12 miles back with all the bags.

Also screw your idea about freezing my ass off in the winter. I work damn hard to pay my house payment and bills and there's no way I'm sitting around in the cold when there's a perfectly good heater there.

Reply Parent Score: 2

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Well I hate to interrupt here with some reality, but some of us have to go to work. If we want to keep our jobs we also have to be there on time, every time. Vehicles are a necessity.


But you choose to live out in the 'suburbs' where there are no public transport - whose to blame for that? whose to blame for public transport not being out there? wouldn't it be best to talk to your local MP and get a movement together to expand the bus and train network out to where you live?

But hey, I'm willing to give this newfangled hippie walk-everywhere thing a chance. Just convince my 2 and 3 year old daughters and my wife that we all have to walk 12 miles, one way to the grocery store this weekend and 12 miles back with all the bags.


Well, you could do what I do; I ride around the same distance to the shops on my bike, I pick up my weeks worth of groceries, do a precarious balancing act with some of the stuff in my back pack along with some in those 'reusable' bags - and ride back home no problems; if I need to get more, or its raining, I just take the bus.

Also screw your idea about freezing my ass off in the winter. I work damn hard to pay my house payment and bills and there's no way I'm sitting around in the cold when there's a perfectly good heater there.


Nobody here said that you must live like some sort of pious puritan, sitting there cold and miserable. Its about realising how much energy you use.

Do you *really* need to have the house so warm that you can walk around in a t-shirt? for me, my power bill is around $100 per month during the winter - want to know why it is so low?

My electricity is low because firstly I don't feel the need to have my house as some sort of boasting factor by owning something that is bigger than what I actually require, and secondly, I don't think that I should be lining the pockets of Contact Energy executives and shareholders by slovenly wasting energy by having my house heated up as if it were some sort of sauna.

Edited 2007-05-03 03:55

Reply Parent Score: 3

StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

If we want to keep our jobs we also have to be there on time, every time. Vehicles are a necessity. But hey, I'm willing to give this newfangled hippie walk-everywhere thing a chance.


He did specifically mention bicycles too. And I don't know where you live, but in this city it's often faster to get around by bicycle - and it's almost always easier to find parking downtown for a bicycle.

Your argument also presents a false dichotomy - pardon me for stating the obvious, but it is possible to make use of more than just a single method of transportation. I personally both own a bicycle and have access to a company vehicle - it's pretty easy to decide which is the appropriate one to use, based on the pragmatic requirements of the situation. I use the car when it makes more sense than biking and vice-versa - and sometimes it makes the most sense to use both. E.g., if I'm going somewhere that I know has lousy parking, then it's easiest to just toss the bike in the trunk and park a few blocks away where it's easier to find space.

Also screw your idea about freezing my ass off in the winter. I work damn hard to pay my house payment and bills and there's no way I'm sitting around in the cold when there's a perfectly good heater there.


I didn't get the impression that the original poster was suggesting people ought to completely eschew electric/gas heat. But it's certainly possible to use those things within reason - if anything, I find it's more convenient to put on a sweater than to wait for my heaters to bring the temperature up.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Dasher42 Member since:
2007-04-05

Just convince my 2 and 3 year old daughters and my wife that we all have to walk 12 miles, one way to the grocery store this weekend and 12 miles back with all the bags.

You're thinking inside the box of a motorized livestyle. I've gone car-less for ten months after moving close to a nice local downtown area full of family shops and small businesses, one of which had my job location. You don't go on mass grocery trips and haul a big load home. You buy a little along the way every day. Now, this means you have to make deliberate lifestyle decisions, but why is the cost of a car, gas, maintenance, insurance, and repair for the privilege of commuting through traffic important to you?

Reply Parent Score: 1