Linked by Eugenia Loli on Mon 7th May 2007 03:14 UTC
Geek stuff, sci-fi... Vernor Vinge, 62, is a pioneer in artificial intelligence, who in a recent interview warned about the risks and opportunities that an electronic super-intelligence would offer to mankind. Vinge is a retired San Diego State University professor of mathematics, computer scientist, and science fiction author. He is well-known for his 1993 manifesto, "The Coming Technological Singularity", in which he argues that exponential growth in technology means a point will be reached where the consequences are unknown. Vinge still believes in this future, which he thinks would come anytime after 2020.
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RE: Yeah right
by Bounty on Mon 7th May 2007 16:17 UTC in reply to "Yeah right"
Bounty
Member since:
2006-09-18

I think we're missing the boat. If translating documents is the mark, they're already smarter than us. If we use a standardized test, I could program a computer to beat most humans easily. That's just data, not intelligence. These are not true benchmarks of our abilities or intelligence.

The day we build a computer truly smarter than us, it should be able to build a computer smarter than it. And that computer should be able to build a computer smarter than it. And that computer should be able to build a computer smarter than it. And that computer should be able to build a computer smarter than it. And that computer should be able to build a computer smarter than it. And that computer should be able to build a computer smarter than it. And that computer should be able to build a computer smarter than it. And that computer should be able to build a computer smarter than it. Ohhh no, I've gone cross eyed.

-Bounty

(p.s. there's your singularity)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Yeah right
by sb56637 on Mon 7th May 2007 17:18 in reply to "RE: Yeah right"
sb56637 Member since:
2006-05-11

>>If translating documents is the mark, they're already smarter than us.

Ummmm... they are? I have yet to find a machine translator that can match the language abilities and comprehension of a bilingual two-year-old child.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Yeah right
by Bounty on Mon 7th May 2007 18:33 in reply to "RE[2]: Yeah right"
Bounty Member since:
2006-09-18

I didn't say comprehension.

Your 2 year old v.s. http://www.google.com/language_tools?hl=en
for TRANSLATING documents. (I know google isn't perfect, but seriously... a 2 year old.)

But you're absolutely right about comprehension. That's kind of my point though. I can't match a computer's data or speed already. (Does that make it smarter than me?) That's why it's a tool. AI already is programming-translating for us. C++ v.s. Assembly, ohh you forgot these optimizations, let me throw them in.

We need a real benchmark to decide when a computer is smarter than us. I'm just saying, depending on how you look at it, they already are. There will probably not be a 'moment' when it happens but many, over time and we may not know or notice.

A computer is much better at math than I am. But most can't solve a problem it isn't specifically programmed for. I often can. I think a computer should be able to solve riddle (it's never seen before), before we claim it has decent AI.

What is more powerful than God, eviler than the Devil, the poor have, the rich need, and if you eat it you die?

(p.s. maybe the computer shouldn't have internet access.... or maybe it should?)

Reply Parent Score: 1