Linked by Eugenia Loli on Thu 10th May 2007 01:53 UTC, submitted by editingwhiz
Red Hat Red Hat announced a new client product, Red Hat Global Desktop, at its annual Red Hat Summit tradeshow in San Diego. This move is designed, in part, to compete with Novell's SUSE Linux Enterprise 10 Desktop, which has achieved success in business desktop markets, and with Ubuntu 7.04, which will soon appear on Dell PCs. Some reporting about this can also be found at the company's magazine. Update: Elsewhere, talking security with Red Hat's Mark Cox.
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by Hiev on Thu 10th May 2007 02:23 UTC
Hiev
Member since:
2005-09-27

"To us, the traditional desktop metaphor is dead"

wow, some one need to tell to the KDE crew that their work is in vane because Red Hat says so.

Reply Score: 5

RE: ...
by Lunitik on Thu 10th May 2007 03:06 in reply to "..."
Lunitik Member since:
2005-08-07

They should simply run with the idea.

There are already signs that they are though, with things like HotNewStuff, they are enabling a more internet focused usage paradigm.

Just get Digikam syncing with Flickr, more of a presence machanism for Kopete, and a way for KOffice to sync with Google tools, you're more than half way there.

I think this is really a great idea, because most people don't really use local tools anymore.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: ...
by searly on Thu 10th May 2007 09:44 in reply to "RE: ..."
searly Member since:
2006-02-27

"I think this is really a great idea, because most people don't really use local tools anymore."

What ??? Nobody using local tools anymore? Nobody i know uses "external" tools (well certainly exclusivly), apart from Flickr and the odd e-mail acount. Certainly in hte businees and enterprise space, no-one i have ever met uses any of the Ajax Web 2.0 Apps. Personally i don't want all my data / documents / photos etc exposed to the whole world (and certainly not for google to extract information and index them).

I think the whole Web 2.0 is just another bubble waiting to burst ... it is nice and interresting and sometimes also useful ... that's about it.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: ...
by BluenoseJake on Thu 10th May 2007 15:31 in reply to "RE: ..."
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

People don't really use local tools anymore? That's just crazy talk. I think most people use a mix of online and local tools, I don't see any big takeup of online office apps, Real graphical work needs local processing, I really wouldn't want to send that 700Mb .psd file across the interweb for storage, and I certainly don't want a web-based IDE. Ripping DVDs/CDs, burning DVDs/CDs, video editing, all stuff that should be done locally, at least for the forseable future.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: ...
by orfanum on Thu 10th May 2007 11:43 in reply to "..."
orfanum Member since:
2006-06-02

depends on how the wind is blowing...(pun intended).

C'mon people, can we please have some linguistic decorum on this site without folk pointing and screaming 'language purist' like some crazed body-snatching pod-person whenever someone raises this sort of point?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: ...
by segedunum on Thu 10th May 2007 12:00 in reply to "..."
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

"To us, the traditional desktop metaphor is dead"

wow, some one need to tell to the KDE crew that their work is in vane because Red Hat says so.


This is because they don't have the technology or the infrastructure available to them to build a desktop with the supporting libraries, APIs and henceforth applications of Windows or a desktop like KDE. After using RHEL and its CentOS form, that much has become very clear to me in the past few months.

Like a lot of others, Red Hat is desperately searching around for a new desktop paradigm that would mean they wouldn't have to put in the sheer amount of donkey work required to build a desktop of the size, scale and general quality of Windows or KDE - certainly in their supporting infrastructure. Unfortunately for them, everybody is not moving their applications to the web. People still buy off-the-shelf software they expect to be able to install, they still use rich client software and ISVs have to be able to build that software with the development tools, libraries and APIs required to do that. You can't just assume everyone will use online services, because that is doomed to failure, and it's not something enterprises are going to fully do either.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: ...
by tristan on Thu 10th May 2007 21:04 in reply to "RE: ..."
tristan Member since:
2006-02-01

This is because they don't have the technology or the infrastructure available to them to build a desktop with the supporting libraries, APIs and henceforth applications of Windows or a desktop like KDE. After using RHEL and its CentOS form, that much has become very clear to me in the past few months.

Like a lot of others, Red Hat is desperately searching around for a new desktop paradigm that would mean they wouldn't have to put in the sheer amount of donkey work required to build a desktop of the size, scale and general quality of Windows or KDE - certainly in their supporting infrastructure. Unfortunately for them, everybody is not moving their applications to the web. People still buy off-the-shelf software they expect to be able to install, they still use rich client software and ISVs have to be able to build that software with the development tools, libraries and APIs required to do that. You can't just assume everyone will use online services, because that is doomed to failure, and it's not something enterprises are going to fully do either.


I'm curious. What, specifically, can a developer do using KDE that cannot be done using GTK+/Gnome?

With the likes of Cairo, GStreamer, DBus and Telepathy -- the last two of which are cross-desktop efforts -- it seems to me that the Gnome platform is itself using just as advanced technology as KDE will be with Arthur, Phonon and the rest.

Of course, as everyone knows, programming in pure GTK in C is horrible. But I'm told the C++ API (gtkmm) is very highly regarded, as is GTK# on Mono. And then there's PyGTK, which is falling-off-a-log easy -- even I can use it.

What Gnome hasn't managed to do anywhere near as successfully as KDE is to tie everything together under a single banner. What they need to do is produce a single website -- say, developers.gnome.org -- full of documentation and code examples for all the technology used on the Gnome platform.

They also need a talented artist to sit down and design a really modern GTK theme using all that Cairo drawing can offer. Even Clearlooks looks pretty old-fashioned these days with its inoffensive greys.

But to say the whole of the Gnome platform is antiquated and need massive investment to get it up to the standard of the competition just doesn't ring true to me.

Edited 2007-05-10 21:08

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: ...
by sbergman27 on Thu 10th May 2007 21:52 in reply to "RE: ..."
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

"""
This is because they don't have the technology or the infrastructure available to them to build a desktop with the supporting libraries, APIs and henceforth applications of Windows or a desktop like KDE.
"""

You're trolling Segedunum.

But I'll answer anyway.

RedHat *could* just use KDE.

But the fact of the matter is that Enterprise Linux distros, who are absolutely free to choose what will work best for them, are uniformly rejecting KDE in favor of Gnome.

Put that in your pipe and smoke it. And that's absolutely *all* I'm going to say on that matter.

If you want a DE war, I'm not participating any further.

Reply Parent Score: 2