Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 17th May 2007 14:58 UTC, submitted by danwarne
Windows "It's the end of the line for 32-bit operating systems, Microsoft has proclaimed at its annual Windows Hardware Engineering conference After the software giant has gotten over its hangover from partying like it's 1999 with the release of Windows Server 2008, it will have one last 32-bit hurrah with a 'release 2' update to Windows Server 2008, and that'll be it. 32 bit CPU: if you have one, learn to love Vista - you're stuck with it.There will be no more versions of Windows - on desktop or server - that will work on 32-bit CPUs like Pentium 4 or Core Duo."
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RE
by Kroc on Thu 17th May 2007 15:38 UTC
Kroc
Member since:
2005-11-10

Microsoft are going to have to do some almighty clever coding for backwards compatibility, because the software industry - born and raised on a platform where writing wonky code is good enough - is only going to come along kicking and screaming.

Only a few days ago, I found out about how the Lexmark printer driver adds a dependency to the spool server for their component, meaning that it is nearly impossible to uninstall the lexmark print driver fully, without disabling all printing capability on the machine. It's naff programming like this, that means that Microsoft have no hopes of enforcing any major change on the market anymore.

The market has already 'balked' at Vista, drivers are way behind date and in "beta" state. If the next OS is even worse, then there will come a time when the industry just puts its foot down and says No.

Reply Score: 4

RE
by sukru on Thu 17th May 2007 15:59 in reply to "RE"
sukru Member since:
2006-11-19

Microsoft are going to have to do some almighty clever coding for backwards compatibility, because the software industry - born and raised on a platform where writing wonky code is good enough - is only going to come along kicking and screaming.


I guess they're dropping backward compatibility in the os alltogether, but use virtualization to support older software instead.

If this ever happens, we'll be finally getting rid of many strange Win32 API functions, which stay there only because some obscure program need it.

It will be a good thing. Even some game studios deliver their "classic" packs with DOSBox. Virtualization seems to be the best of two worlds (backward compatibility and progress).

(And finally we have the ability to quote replies in OsNews)

Reply Parent Score: 2