Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 17th May 2007 18:54 UTC
Gnome In the GNOME bugzilla, there is an ongoing discussion about whether or not to include a patch into the default GNOME installation which would enable GNOME to (optionally) have a global application menubar, similar to that of the Mac OS and KDE (in the latter it is optional and off by default). Installation instructions and .deb packages, as well as a 60-page (and counting) discussion of the patch, are available on the UbuntuForums. Read on for a poll on this issue.
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RE[5]: Why?
by nutshell42 on Fri 18th May 2007 15:48 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Why?"
nutshell42
Member since:
2006-01-12

I haven't used Office 2007, but the screenshot seems familiar to me in terms of UI elements. Is that toolbar any different from a tabbed toolbar?


Huh?
In Office 2007 you can more or less create your own toolbar with the stuff you really need in the titlebar (+the file menu).


Admittedly in the last paragraph I *did* mean both the toolbar in the window title bar and the ribbon but the rest clearly wasn't about the ribbon.

If so, these things already exist,
Where? AIS I'd really be interested in a DE like that at least to have tried it once.

Basically, if the user has to hover the mouse over the toolbar to get a tooltip, the whole point of the toolbar is lost -- it becomes just as efficient as a menu, only with more sugar.

The idea is that you have a menu but with more screen real estate so you can have icons for all entries and text for the most important ones plus titles for different grouped icons.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/4c/Office2007ribbon.png

It makes for easier access to functions, especially instead of large menus (that's the reason MS switched to the ribbon).

Imho the tabbed nature could be more of a problem in progs where you need only one entry of a menu and after that don't need the menu at all for a long time. In that case instead of menu->entry you'd have to click menu-tab->entry->home-tab to get back to the normal toolbar.

The reason I'd be interested in such a DE anyway is that I think there are possible work-arounds to that problem.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: Why?
by alexandru_lz on Fri 18th May 2007 16:08 in reply to "RE[5]: Why?"
alexandru_lz Member since:
2007-02-11

I haven't used Office 2007, but the screenshot seems familiar to me in terms of UI elements. Is that toolbar any different from a tabbed toolbar?

Huh?
In Office 2007 you can more or less create your own toolbar with the stuff you really need in the titlebar (+the file menu).


Well... I was referring only to the ribbon.
A tabbed toolbar is, well, a combination between a toolbar and a tabbed view. You have one toolbar with several tabs -- and, as you click each of the tabs, a different set of buttons is displayed. Much like, ugh, this one: http://www.library.uq.edu.au/iad/databases/images/bsp_tabbar.gif .

I'm not sure what you meant by the office UI used consistently for all apps. If you refer to using a widget similar to the Office Ribbon for every application, I don't know of any; afaik, all past experiments with something similar haven't been too successful (in fact, a couple of 3rd party apps to patch the Office Ribbon and give MS Office its old look are already around). If you refer to all applications having a consistent, similar interface, that's NeXTStep, and if it wasn't for Steve Jobs' stupid ideas it might have got much further than being chopped into OS X.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: Why?
by chris_dk on Sat 19th May 2007 10:13 in reply to "RE[5]: Why?"
chris_dk Member since:
2005-07-12

The Ribbon was invented as a response to feature creep and too many menu options.

It basically only works for applications with many menu options.

Reply Parent Score: 1