Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 22nd May 2007 15:22 UTC, submitted by kev009
General Unix Prior to the general availability of AIX 6, IBM intends to make a pre-release version of AIX 6 available in an open beta. "AIX is an open, standards-based UNIX operating system that provides the enterprise information technology infrastructure for thousands of clients around the world. IBM intends to take the next step in the evolution of the AIX operating system with the release of the AIX V6.1 OS."
Thread beginning with comment 242347
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE[2]: Just curious...
by zimbatm on Tue 22nd May 2007 16:22 UTC in reply to "RE: Just curious..."
zimbatm
Member since:
2005-08-22

If you had read the article (last section), you would have seen that the open is not for "AIX 6 Open" but for "Open Beta". Which itself is refined as open for all their customers and not open for the world.

"The open beta program for AIX 6 will allow clients to download, install and run an early version of AIX 6 on suitable IBM systems in a non-production, non-supported mode."

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Just curious...
by Robert Escue on Tue 22nd May 2007 16:30 in reply to "RE[2]: Just curious..."
Robert Escue Member since:
2005-07-08

Read the first paragraph:

"AIX® is an open, standards-based UNIX operating system (OS) that provides the enterprise information technology infrastructure for thousands of clients around the world. IBM intends to take the next step in the evolution of the AIX operating system with the release of the AIX V6.1 OS."

That is what fretinator is refering to and my response is based on IBM's literature and some experience with AIX 5L 5.2.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Just curious...
by fretinator on Tue 22nd May 2007 16:32 in reply to "RE[2]: Just curious..."
fretinator Member since:
2005-07-06

If you had read the article (last section), you would have seen that the open is not for "AIX 6 Open" but for "Open Beta". Which itself is refined as open for all their customers and not open for the world.


Actually, no.

Here it is from Wikipedia:

"Open systems are computer systems that provide some combination of interoperability, portability, and open software standards. (It can also mean systems configured to allow unrestricted access by people and/or other computers; this article only discusses the first meaning.)

The term originated in the late 1970s and early 1980s, mainly to describe systems based on Unix, especially in contrast to the more entrenched mainframes and minicomputers in use at that time. Unlike older legacy systems, the newer generation of Unix systems featured standardized programming interfaces and peripheral interconnects; third party development of hardware and software was encouraged, a significant departure from the norm of the time, which saw companies such as Amdahl and Hitachi going to court for the right to sell systems and peripherals that were compatible with IBM's mainframes.

The definition of "open system" can be said to have become more formalized in the 1990s with the emergence of independently administered software standards such as The Open Group's Single UNIX Specification."

[EDIT: Cleaned up quoting]

Edited 2007-05-22 16:34

Reply Parent Score: 5