Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 27th May 2007 18:37 UTC, submitted by anonymous
General Development "A startup in Alameda, Calif. plans to release a kind of holy software grail the third or fourth week of June. Lina said its dual-licensed Lina virtual Linux machine will run more or less normal Linux applications under Windows, Mac, or Linux, with a look and feel native to each."
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Not necessary
by Xaero_Vincent on Sun 27th May 2007 20:17 UTC
Xaero_Vincent
Member since:
2006-08-18

Most open source software (about 90%) on Linux are ported to Windows and other Unix-like/Unix OSes.

So this product is not necessary.

Whats needed is a painless, truely effective way of bringing commercial Windows apps to FOSS platforms.

Wine is still not painless and truely effective after 14 years of development.

When the Windows developer community migrates fully to .NET, Wine and it's Win32 API implementation will become irrelevent in the quest to run future Windows apps on *nix.

Edited 2007-05-27 20:23

Reply Score: 4

RE: Not necessary
by Ringheims Auto on Sun 27th May 2007 20:26 in reply to "Not necessary"
Ringheims Auto Member since:
2005-07-23

Gotta agree with you. After those 14 years Wine still doesn't make for much more than a curiosity. I mean, what is the fun of running apps on a reverse engineered implementation of an already bogus platform..?

I don't mean to come down on all the hard and good work of the Wine team, but for me it's just not working and believe me I've tried.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Not necessary
by porcel on Mon 28th May 2007 21:43 in reply to "RE: Not necessary"
porcel Member since:
2006-01-28

Try running crossover office, if you can't make wine work for you. The Crossover office folks take care of a lot of small details to make sure that the packaging and installation of both wine and of windows applications on Linux is easy and more reliable.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Not necessary
by Alwin on Sun 27th May 2007 23:32 in reply to "Not necessary"
Alwin Member since:
2005-07-17


Most open source software (about 90%) on Linux are ported to Windows and other Unix-like/Unix OSes.


So this could be used to bring the remaining 10%, and closed-source Linux apps (there are some, you know) to Windows and other platforms, all in one swoop (for those apps that work under this environment).

Yet another way to make apps cross-platform, and thus easier switch the underlying OS, if you want to. Read: let Windows users play with apps that are popular on Linux, and (at some later time), have less reason to object to a Windows -> Linux move. Or simply 1 more option to "run something on anything". Sounds good to me, regardless of how much real-life use it finds.

I hope they make licensing such that free (as in: gratis) re-distribution is possible. Too many restrictions, and widespread adoption/use won't happen.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Not necessary
by BluenoseJake on Mon 28th May 2007 14:27 in reply to "RE: Not necessary"
BluenoseJake Member since:
2005-08-11

"Read: let Windows users play with apps that are popular on Linux, and (at some later time), have less reason to object to a Windows -> Linux move"

Windows users can already play with all the popular Linux apps on Windows, no vm needed. I run the same apps on Windows as I do in Linux or BSD, OpenOffice, Firefox, Gaim, xchat, the gimp, celestia, you name it. Maybe this might help people run KDE or gnome on Windows, now that's not such a bad idea.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Not necessary
by draethus on Mon 28th May 2007 07:03 in reply to "Not necessary"
draethus Member since:
2006-08-02

Wine is still not painless and truely effective after 14 years of development.

It's already good enough for thousands of apps and games, and it gets better and better all the time.

When the Windows developer community migrates fully to .NET, Wine and it's Win32 API implementation will become irrelevent in the quest to run future Windows apps on *nix.

The Windows developer community will never migrate fully to .NET, and even if they do it will mean nothing: people using .NET hardcode paths with backslashes making them unusable on Linux - there is Path.Separator, but nobody uses it. It's also costly to rewrite code in .NET, you're more likely to see mixed Windows/.NET apps like Visual Studio 2005 is. Using wine + Microsoft's .NET or wine + Windows version of Mono will probably work better than using only the Linux version of Mono.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Not necessary
by ramunas on Mon 28th May 2007 09:09 in reply to "Not necessary"
ramunas Member since:
2005-07-06


Most open source software (about 90%) on Linux are ported to Windows and other Unix-like/Unix OSes.


So every one of those 90% have to port individualy, lina could help alleviate porting by providing one platform.


When the Windows developer community migrates fully to .NET, Wine and it's Win32 API implementation will become irrelevent in the quest to run future Windows apps on *nix.


The .Net itself is implemented on top of Win32 API and that won't change in near future. Although is huge adoption in windows community there still quite a lot of sceptics which won't use .Net.

Overall I think lina is quite nice, it's like UML but portable ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2