Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 12th Jun 2007 19:46 UTC, submitted by Dale Smoker
Legal Internet search leader Google is trying to convince federal and state authorities that Microsoft's Vista operating system is stifling competition as the high-tech heavyweights wrestle for the allegiance of personal computer users. In a 49-page document filed April 18 with the U.S. Justice Department and state attorneys general, Google alleged that the latest version of Microsoft's Windows operating system impairs the performance of 'desktop search' programs that find data stored on a computer's hard drive. Besides bogging down competing programs, Google alleged Microsoft had made it too complicated to turn off the desktop search feature built into Vista.
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sappyvcv
Member since:
2005-07-06

Regarding conspiracies: I don't think it makes it more or less likely, but it makes me less likely to believe it when it sounds like a conspiracy theory -- i.e. involves many people to cooperate in covering something up.

Regarding point #3: No they don't care about getting badmouthed. But they do care about doing something that they know WILL get them in legal trouble. There is a difference in the amount of hesistance it will cause.

Regarding #4: Fair enough

Regarding #5: It's easier to keep something a secret when it's something good and leaking will cost you your job, reputation and possibly put you into much legal trouble. When it involves keeping illegal practices quiet, it's harder. See the term "whistleblower".

Reply Parent Score: 2

archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

But they do care about doing something that they know WILL get them in legal trouble. There is a difference in the amount of hesistance it will cause.


It's a matter of risk assessment, I suppose, i.e. "what's the chance we have of getting caught, how much would it cost if we did, and how does this compare to the value (monetary and strategic) this has for us."

It's easier to keep something a secret when it's something good and leaking will cost you your job, reputation and possibly put you into much legal trouble. When it involves keeping illegal practices quiet, it's harder.


Right, although it's not that clear-cut in this case. Would you risk your career on something which is not guaranteed to be declared illegal? Whistleblowers do exist, but they're (unfortunately) few and far between. Most people would rather close their eyes, especially on something as relatively innocuous as this (compared to, say, what was happening with the tobacco industry).

I certainly hope that Microsoft has changed its ways enough to refrain from these types of dirty tricks, and I'll wait until more information is available before making my mind about the case. However, my original point still stands: it's much too early to dismiss the case off-hand.

(As a side note, this particular criticism was not aimed at you, but rather at the first few posters in this thread.)

Reply Parent Score: 2