Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 15th Jun 2007 22:17 UTC, submitted by prymitive
GNU, GPL, Open Source A lengthy debate that began with a suggestion to dual license the Linux kernel under the GPLv2 and the GPLv3 continues on the Linux Kernel Mailing List. Throughout the ongoing thread Linux creator Linus Torvalds has spoken out on the GPLv2, the upcoming GPLv3, the BSD license, Tivo, the Free Software Foundation, and much more. During the discussion, he was asked we he chose the GPLv2 over the BSD license when he's obviously not a big fan of the FSF.
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funny...Linux branches..*BSD's merge
by rhavenn on Sat 16th Jun 2007 16:51 UTC
rhavenn
Member since:
2006-05-12

It's funny that Linux under the GPL is one of the most splintered and branched systems around. Oh sure, the core kernel is somewhat joined together, but even there you can find different versions that are used as people disagree on idealogies, etc...

The BSDs are one of the tightest and well laid out base systems you will find. Sure, people can take the code and not contribute back. However, the core system remains well ahead of Linux in tightness, neatness and "merging".

Reply Score: 2

dagw Member since:
2005-07-06

I disagree. BSD has neither significant branching or merging. There are three or four trunks where everything happens. Whether this is good or bad is open for debate.

Linux and Linux distros has lots and lots of branching AND merging. People are both allowed and encouraged to take the code and try all kinds of strange things in any way they please, and then people are allowed and encouraged to take anything they see other people doing and they think looks cool or useful and merge it into their branch. Whether this is good or bad is open for debate.

Reply Parent Score: 2

anevilyak Member since:
2005-09-14

I disagree. BSD has neither significant branching or merging. There are three or four trunks where everything happens. Whether this is good or bad is open for debate.


There's a fair amount of technological cross-pollination between the major BSDs. They may not be forking/merging, but they do freely import code from each other where it makes sense to.

Reply Parent Score: 1

apoclypse Member since:
2007-02-17

Actually if you see Linus' talk at google about git you would see that this is exactly what he wants. Git is designed so that users can create a lot of branches but his main focus was on merging which is fairly easy to do in git. This is Linus' philosophy on software development. He wants people to branch, but what's more important is the merging when necessary. It should be easy to merge back any changes from all these distros into one main kernel if possible without having to worry about licenses. There is nothing stopping an Uber linux with all the changes that have been made to each distro that has come or ever will be, the choice is there. BSD on the other hand doesn't encourage merging if someone takes a BSD licensed software changes something and DOESN'T want to merge back he doesn't have to. With the GPL you have to. That's the main difference. Linux is about choice, but you also know that if someone else chooses another path from yours you can always choose to head in their direction for a bit. That is what is meant by branching in merging in the linux community. The idea of merging has little to do with the software itself but with the ability to bring others ideas into your project without worrying that their license won't be compatible with your or that someone took you idea and ran with it but you can't use what they added to it.

Edited 2007-06-17 00:30

Reply Parent Score: 1