Linked by Eugenia Loli on Tue 19th Jun 2007 22:05 UTC
In the News Pocket Informant is one of the most successful PDA applications ever. However, it has not been immune to software piracy. The CEO of WebIS posted an open letter explaining how software piracy is hurting the industry, but also the consumer too and especially small software houses like his.
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Agreed
by chocobanana on Tue 19th Jun 2007 22:43 UTC
chocobanana
Member since:
2006-01-04

That's why I now use freeware, oss and pay for the comercial games I play.

What bothers me is that there's lot of people out there that already know about the free alternatives and prefer to use commercial pirated software just out of lazyness or unwilling to learn (the many times) few differences between the mainstream commercial apps and the free ones.

Also preconceptions are a better motive to pirate software instead of using software legally.

The problem is that since software isn't something perceived as a material thing, and since it is so easily available on p2p or warez sites, people don't have to get their hands dirty and it makes it quite compelling to get it pirated. What pirate users don't know is that there's a lot of effort put into the development of these programs. I'm not even talking about big or specialized high-end software companies. I'm talking about guys like the ones from WebIS.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Agreed
by sbergman27 on Wed 20th Jun 2007 00:25 in reply to "Agreed"
sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

"""
What bothers me is that there's lot of people out there that already know about the free alternatives and prefer to use commercial pirated software just out of lazyness or unwilling to learn (the many times) few differences between the mainstream commercial apps and the free ones.
"""

Excellent point, chocobanana. While some of them *might* buy the product if they can't get it any other way, I'm convinced that piracy hurts FOSS *more* than it hurts the products being pirated, which at least gain mind share, which has tangible value.

Meanwhile, FOSS competes at a disadvantage, because heck, the proprietary stuff is a "freebie" anyway. The pirates don't consider FOSS because, as you say, it's easier to just pirate MS Office.

GPL and other FOSS licenses, even BSD, are grounded in the right of the creator to specify how his creations, both source code and binary, are used.

If you believe in FOSS, you really have to condemn piracy. Not because it hurts FOSS (which it does) but because it undermines the very basis of our philosophy.

Edited 2007-06-20 00:27

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Agreed
by Eugenia on Wed 20th Jun 2007 00:29 in reply to "RE: Agreed"
Eugenia Member since:
2005-06-28

Your points are mute in this case. There is not "Free" alternative for what these guys are offering. And yet, they get pirated to death. This CEO is 100% justfied to complain about the situation.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Agreed
by g2devi on Wed 20th Jun 2007 20:10 in reply to "Agreed"
g2devi Member since:
2005-07-09

No disagreements here.


The beauty of F/OSS is that you don't have to make excuses to pirate since pirating F/OSS is impossible. And because you're not treated as a criminal before you did anything wrong or pushed into paying for planned obscelescence, you become more of a stickler for the license terms, sometimes help out in some way, and either avoid software that has terms you don't like or obey the reasonable terms or pay for-fee proprietary software that you really want rather than pirate it.


The irony of his position is that I'm willing to bet that if you told him to promote the idea "Don't pirate. Either use F/OSS or pay up.", he'd balk since F/OSS steals business away from him (unless he supports Linux commercially) and is often superior to shareware (compare VLC to Windows Media Player, file-roller to Winzip, OpenOffice to most non-Microsoft commercial word processors, etc).

Reply Parent Score: 2