Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 1st Jul 2007 10:30 UTC
Legal SWSoft, the company behind Parallels Desktop for Mac, is possibly violating the LGPL license by using LGPL libraries from the WINE project without providing access to the source code. The WINE project first discovered the violation early this June, and after several failed attempts at getting the source code to the libraries, they set up a wiki page to keep track of the ongoing violation. The WINE project wants to resolve the issue "without starting legal action". Thanks to MacWereld for pointing this out [Dutch].
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Dark_Knight
Member since:
2005-07-10

Since Parallels is closed source then most likely this will need to be handled through the court system to have an independent review of each projects code. Even though I'm a supporter of the Linux movement I can see the reasoning why a closed source developer would be cautious showing an open source developer their code.

Reply Parent Score: 1

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Since Parallels is closed source then most likely this will need to be handled through the court system to have an independent review of each projects code. Even though I'm a supporter of the Linux movement I can see the reasoning why a closed source developer would be cautious showing an open source developer their code.


The code to Parallels itself is closed, and it belongs to Apple, and that code is not the subject of this discussion.

Parallels has linked in some code from the Wine project. It is that Wine code that is under discussion. That code is LGPL code, and as such, anyone redistibuting it is required to release the source code, along with any changes made to the source code, FOR THE PARTS THAT ARE GPL CODE.

There is no question of a "closed source developer ... showing an open source developer their code". The Wine code at issue here is NOT Parallel's code.

Edited 2007-07-01 15:03

Reply Parent Score: 4

zbrimhall Member since:
2006-08-21

The code to Parallels itself is closed, and it belongs to Apple

Just to clarify, Parallels is owned by Parallels, Inc. (http://www.parallels.com/), not Apple. In fact, Parallels, Inc. sells two versions of its software: Parallels Worksation, for Linux and Windows; and Parallels Desktop, for Mac.

Reply Parent Score: 5

deanlinkous Member since:
2006-06-19

Since Parallels is closed source then most likely this will need to be handled through the court system to have an independent review of each projects code. Even though I'm a supporter of the Linux movement I can see the reasoning why a closed source developer would be cautious showing an open source developer their code.


Parallels has stated that they use LGPL software and have modified it so what review is needed????

Edited 2007-07-01 15:24

Reply Parent Score: 3

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Parallels has stated that they use LGPL software and have modified it so what review is needed????


Precisely. If Parallels have used LGPL software and have modified it and they are re-distributing it as part of Parallels, then the LGPL license requires them to provide the modified LGPL source code to whomever asks for it.

This requirement applies ONLY to the code which is licensed as LGPL, it does not apply to the rest of the Parallels code.

Reply Parent Score: 5