Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 3rd Jul 2007 14:53 UTC, submitted by Tony Mobily
Microsoft "The more I think about Microsoft, the more I realise that they are, possibly for the first time, seriously cornered (or surrounded, depending on how you want to see it). A little history will clarify why I think so - and why I think that this might really be the beginning of the end for Microsoft."
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Yeah, yeah...
by yorch on Tue 3rd Jul 2007 15:29 UTC
yorch
Member since:
2006-01-28

Uhm... could you, Mr. Writer, try to look out from your Linux world just for a sec?

Year after year I read an article like this, and year after year:

MSFT - Mill. of USD
===============

Total Revenue:
2001 - 25,296.00
2002 - 28,365.00
2003 - 32,187.00
2004 - 36,835.00
2005 - 39,788.00
2006 - 44,282.00

Gross Profit:
2001 - 21,841.00
2002 - 22,666.00
2003 - 26,128.00
2004 - 30,239.00
2005 - 33,757.00
2006 - 36,632.00

Analyst preview record Income and Profit for FY2007.

Microsoft has now more solutions in the market than never (just look at the product portfolio) and the true is, Mr. Writer, more and more companies are relaying on those solution, year after year.

Get the facts, Mr. Writer.

David

Reply Score: 5

RE: Yeah, yeah...
by Kroc on Tue 3rd Jul 2007 15:44 in reply to "Yeah, yeah..."
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

I think the article author fails to realise that if Microsoft stopped making money right now, they could coast for the next 50 years on reserves alone.

Microsoft are as strong as ever. If the free software proponents want Linux to increase worldwide usage, then they should be focusing on improving every aspect of the system instead of writing clueless articles about the downfall of Microsoft.

Microsoft are becoming like Apple - Profitably dying for decades! ;)

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Yeah, yeah...
by twenex on Wed 4th Jul 2007 08:07 in reply to "RE: Yeah, yeah..."
twenex Member since:
2006-04-21

I think the article author fails to realise that if Microsoft stopped making money right now, they could coast for the next 50 years on reserves alone.

I think the comment author fails to realise that in the technology business, two to four years of not keeping up can be fatal. When Digital was swallowed up by Compaq, it was the biggest corporate buyout in history - and now only people like those who read this site know it ever existed. Obviously that won't happen with Microsoft, but for them, oblivion is only another Vista-like failure or two away.

Microsoft are as strong as ever. If the free software proponents want Linux to increase worldwide usage, then they should be focusing on improving every aspect of the system instead of writing clueless articles about the downfall of Microsoft.

Linux is as strong as ever. If Microsoft proponents want Microsoft to keep up, they should be focussing on getting Microsoft to listen to the customer again instead of writing clueless comments about the invincibility of Microsoft.

Microsoft are becoming like Apple - Profitably dying for decades! ;)

Since when is Apple dying? They nearly died, I'll give you that - but Jobs, OS X, and the iPod made sure they'll be around for quite a while yet.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Yeah, yeah...
by archiesteel on Tue 3rd Jul 2007 16:05 in reply to "Yeah, yeah..."
archiesteel Member since:
2005-07-02

Do you have an online source for these numbers? (I'm not doubting them at all, by the way - I'd just want to keep the link for future reference...)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Yeah, yeah...
by yorch on Tue 3rd Jul 2007 16:12 in reply to "RE: Yeah, yeah..."
yorch Member since:
2006-01-28
RE: Yeah, yeah...
by Lobotomik on Tue 3rd Jul 2007 16:48 in reply to "Yeah, yeah..."
Lobotomik Member since:
2006-01-03

There are more solutions in the market with free software than there have ever been too, and more are coming.

Linux is already doing great in the server arena, in database, file server, web server applications. It has totally stormed into High Performance Computing: most of the top 100 fastest computers in the world run Linux (and few, if any, run Windows).

Intel's MIDs will run Linux; Windows is too resource greedy and Windows CE sucks for all but the simplest applications. Asus new superinexpensive computers will also run Linux, for the same reasons, and also because Windows is too expensive for such an inexpensive machine. The OLPC will hopefully put millions of computers running Linux in the hands of children all over the world. If not, maybe Intel will with its new cheap laptop computers.

So, it cannot be said that Linux is not growing in the mobile desktop arena.

Motorola is putting Linux inside its newer smartphones, featurephones and even cheap-phones. Palm Treos will soon run Linux too. Nokia is wetting its toes in this area with its web pads. In the far east, Linux is taking the smartphone market by storm. Telephone switches have often been running Carrier Grade Linux for some time now.

Linux is definitely growing VERY fast at all levels of the telephony and communications market.

Sony, LG, Tivo, Philips and many others are putting Linux into all kind of consumer electronic devices, where Microsoft is conspicuously absent. In the embedded industrial market, it is displacing all other operating systems (though Microsoft is doing OK there too -- just not as well).

Linux is achieving critical mass, and its growth is ever faster, locked in a virtuous cycle as it piles up improvements coming its contributors in all of its application markets. OK, it might never conquer the Western Desktop Space, although it will surely gain a lot more share than it currently has. But the world is much larger and diverse than western desktops.

As for Microsoft, sure, they will most likely continue making lots of money. Some of their products are really good, some are good enough, and some are just pulled by Microsoft's titanic traction. But I think it is clear they will have to accomodate a growing competitor in their home turf, and I looks like they will be locked out of immense emerging markets.

By the way, that little thing you do, repeating the "Mr. Writer" bit sure is cunning!

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Yeah, yeah...
by Kroc on Tue 3rd Jul 2007 20:01 in reply to "RE: Yeah, yeah..."
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

As cunning as a fox who's just been appointed Professor of Cunning at Oxford University?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Yeah, yeah...
by christianhgross on Wed 4th Jul 2007 13:45 in reply to "Yeah, yeah..."
christianhgross Member since:
2005-11-15

It is interesting that you posted those numbers. BECAUSE that is the truth of the matter. Look at RedHat a decade later and look at its income stream. PEANUTS! The problem that Open Source people have, and why Open Source will not dominate is because they fail to look at the bottom line.

As much as it costs to get Microsoft, it creates an ecosystem where you can earn money. I know I have tried countless times to make my money with stuff like Open Source, Java, etc. In the end I always end up with Microsoft and making money. At this point and 15 years later I have decided that yes I like Open Source and will use it, but Windows is here to stay whether I like it or not. Heck Windows is not even THAT bad...

Reply Parent Score: 1