Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 6th Jul 2007 19:50 UTC, submitted by juno_106
Opera Software "Back in January we added the ability to report usage of different features and preferences so we could learn more about how the browser is used in general. First we invited you, our weekly users to help us and in 9.2 we started asking one in 100 users if they want to participate. We would like to share some of our findings with you."
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Some interesting revelations
by sbergman27 on Fri 6th Jul 2007 23:29 UTC
sbergman27
Member since:
2005-07-24

# A preference we added by popular request, the ability to turn on Fit to Width by default is used by 0.0%

Wow. Features most requested by users are not necessarily used, once actually provided. Now *that* is an issue worth looking into, and of significance to other projects, as well.

# You're not left-handed p: Well... the option to flip the buttons for mouse gestures is used by only 1% of those who enabled mouse gestures, which possibly indicates that many left-handed users prefer a right-handed mouse setup.


As a "left-handed" person, I would point out that few people are truly left handed. Most left handed people write with their left hands (which is pretty much the definition) and use whatever hand is convenient for most other things. When I was in elementary school, my mother used to insist upon getting me those damned "lefty" scisors for art class. Never could cut a thing with them and I often ended up borrowing someone else's normal scissors.

# JavaScript and Plugins are both used by more than 99% by default

As an advocate of web applications, I'm glad to see this. f--k people who turn javascript off. They should *expect* the modern web to be broken for them. Web developers should not waste valuable time and energy catering to them.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Some interesting revelations
by Kroc on Fri 6th Jul 2007 23:43 in reply to "Some interesting revelations"
Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

Excuse me? F--k me did you say? There's a reason I opt-in to Javascript.

* Intellitext. Ruining the whole concept of hyperlinks
* Slide in DHTML ads that cover the content.
* A million flash objects loading into the page locking your machine up
* Popups that manage to now and again get around the popup blocker

It's web developers who should not be wasting my time with their obtrusive natty scripts. I remember the web before Javascript. It was pretty good for the time.

Website designers who cannot create a site that can gracefully degrade, are just bad programmers, enough said. As well as techites like me, there's also disabled persons who may be browsing the web with browsers that either do not support javascript, or have limited support - and it's against the law to prevent them suitable access to e-commerce sites.

Reply Parent Score: 5

sappyvcv Member since:
2005-07-06

Website designers who cannot create a site that can gracefully degrade, are just bad programmers, enough said.

Or the very small percentage of people that don't have JS enable are not worth the extra resources it might take to work around lack of javascript. Some things are not so easy to degrace gracefully. Trust me, I have to deal with that at work.

Reply Parent Score: 5

CrimsonScythe Member since:
2005-07-10

This is one of the reasons I love Opera. I disable features such as cookies, plugins, and javascript by default, and add the features back on a need and trust basis using the "Edit site preferences" option on the right-click menu. Not only does that make the browser snappier, but one can avoid all of those annoyances in your list. Also, I'll have to say it's surprisingly rare that I actually need to use that menu.

PS. Can't wait for Kestrel! ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

"""
Website designers who cannot create a site that can gracefully degrade, are just bad programmers, enough said.
"""

To put it bluntly, that's just stupid. Increasing the complexity of a program by doing everything 2 ways, first the convoluted way for people who refuse to use modern technology, and then the simpler and cleaner way using the capabilities of the browser that 99% of people have turned on (according to the article) and leaving both code paths in is *not* good programming practice. (Unless you get paid by the hour, of course.)

If it means that assistive technologies need to get smarter and deal with the fact that browsers are smart clients and not dumb terminals then so be it.

P.S. I would hardly call the programmers behind Google Docs and Spreadsheets "bad programmers".

Edited 2007-07-07 01:13

Reply Parent Score: 5

Liquidator Member since:
2007-03-04

Now this is ridiculous. If you ban Javascript, you left the webapps bandwagon. 99% of web applications these days use Ajax (javascript), here's what you can't use: Gmail (fast version), Google Docs, Zimbra, Yahoo!Mail (Beta version), and the fast-increasing number of web sites that use Ajax. At one point there will be so many web sites that will be broken on your computer that you may end up giving up. Javascript is basically Ecmascript, which is a web standard (http://www.w3.org/DOM/).

This remembers geeks in the 90's who said they would ban CSS because it didn't add to the web. They all use CSS these days and they don't complain anymore. If the owners of the web sites you visit use Javascript to display ads, they probably have good reasons, they need to make money. You also probably whine at TV commercial like I do, but we end up watching TV (well I don't very often!). If bloggers couldn't place ads with Javascript, they would use plain XHTML coding and it would be no better for you. And to go back to web applications, if there wasn't Javascript, web applications would turn server applications, where everything is run on the server. These days, half of the cde of webapps are run on the client desktop and with Ajax they are less sluggish than they used to be. You should be thankful.

Edited 2007-07-07 09:59

Reply Parent Score: 5

StephenBeDoper Member since:
2005-07-06

# A preference we added by popular request, the ability to turn on Fit to Width by default is used by 0.0%

Wow. Features most requested by users are not necessarily used, once actually provided. Now *that* is an issue worth looking into, and of significance to other projects, as well.


Heh. Now there's a link to save for the next time someone pops into a Haiku comment thread to steadfastly insist that "Haiku must include ______ feature/functionality or it will never succeed!!!"

As an advocate of web applications, I'm glad to see this. f--k people who turn javascript off. They should *expect* the modern web to be broken for them. Web developers should not waste valuable time and energy catering to them.


That situation probably wouldn't exist if javascript wasn't mis-used so frequently. I constantly see things done with javascript that could easily be done with straight (X)HTML, or should be done with a server-side scripting language. With the web development work I've personally done, JS has been largely a "last resort" that's only used if I can't find a way to do something with XHTML or PHP/ASP.

Reply Parent Score: 2