Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 11th Jul 2007 22:45 UTC
Microsoft Microsoft has reiterated its commitment to the desktop. Building on its co-founder Bill Gates' vision of a PC on every desk in every home, Microsoft will continue to focus on delivering desktop products. And in this context, nothing will change when it comes down to the development of the company's main cash cows. Windows Vista and the 2007 Office System will be followed by Windows Seven and Office 14. Kevin Turner, Chief Operating Officer, present at the Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference 2007 in Denver on July 10 emphasized the fact that Windows Vista will neither be the last of its kind, nor the last big operating system release from the Redmond company. The same strategy is valid for the Office 2007 System.
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RE[6]: Tangent
by twenex on Thu 12th Jul 2007 15:49 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Tangent"
twenex
Member since:
2006-04-21

Before "Microsoft" and "the PC" people were happily using Amstrads, Atari's and Amiga's. Heck, I would be confident to go so far to say that back in the good old days, the Amiga did a lot better at meeting the end users requirements than the crap we see today.

Well, hurrah. I can finally agree with you on something wholeheartedly.

I remember the variety of languages, REXX, AmigaBASIC, and AMOS - massive amounts of documentation when you bought a computer, if you wanted to be a programmer, you had all the documentation there. Heck, when I had an Amiga 500, there was sufficient documentation to not only help you how to use Kindwords, but also how to write your own applications. OTOH I wish I could agree with you there. I'm not saying you're wrong, just that mine didn't come with that. OTOH these days you can download perl, python, c, several lisps...all of them for free and several of them for both Linux and Windows.

But again, yes, even Linux does some things wrong, or allows you to do in a million different ways in the hope that it will please somebody, that Amiga/Commodore (miraculously, it seems, given the latter's repuation) got right first time.

You could play games; plonk in a disk, and it would load up and voila, no directx, no opengl jihads, everything just worked as it should be. Same goes for applications - it all worked as it should. Anyone from that era can't honestly look at back and consider what was accomplished with such limited system specifications wasn't remarkable.

Agreed.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[7]: Tangent
by kaiwai on Fri 13th Jul 2007 04:39 in reply to "RE[6]: Tangent"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Well, hurrah. I can finally agree with you on something wholeheartedly.


The first sign of the apocalypse is near :-)

OTOH I wish I could agree with you there. I'm not saying you're wrong, just that mine didn't come with that. OTOH these days you can download perl, python, c, several lisps...all of them for free and several of them for both Linux and Windows.

But again, yes, even Linux does some things wrong, or allows you to do in a million different ways in the hope that it will please somebody, that Amiga/Commodore (miraculously, it seems, given the latter's repuation) got right first time.


The great thing with Amiga (along with other platforms) it married beautifully the geek attraction factor along with ease of you. It was a machine that as a geek you could experiment and do really cool things, and on the other hand, could be used as an easy to use family computer.

The problem with Linux (currently) it has the geek factor but lacks the trappings people expect - a large selection of commercial third party software. MYOB for example, holds 90%+ of the small to medium business market in New Zealand/Australia - for small businesses to move, there needs to be MYOB to be made available.

I admit, the vast majority of issues actually sit beyond what distributors can't directly solve, but at the same time, it has to be acknowledged that there are things which are holding back adoption that go beyond the Microsoft related conspiracy theories.

I've deployed Linux desktops (specifically SLED), and I can assure you that the biggest questions aren't ease of use - they're happy with the desktop, heck, my mum thinks its easier than Windows. The issue is when they say, "oh, can I run zyx application" - most are happy with running OpenOffice.org/StarOffice, but they don't want to give up their label makers, their Genealogy applications, their accounting software which they know how to use, and have a tonne of files saved in an uninportable format.

Edited 2007-07-13 04:43

Reply Parent Score: 2