Linked by Eugenia Loli on Thu 12th Jul 2007 19:23 UTC, submitted by wibbit
Apple Apple has bought the CUPS code base, and has hired it's lead developer. "CUPS was written by Michael R Sweet, an owner of Easy Software Products. In February of 2007 Apple Inc. hired Michael and acquired ownership the CUPS source code. While Michael is primarily working on non-CUPS projects, he will continue to develop and support CUPS, which is still being released under the existing GPL2/LGPL2 licensing terms."
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RE[9]: Re: Say What?
by cyclops on Thu 12th Jul 2007 22:19 UTC in reply to "RE[8]: Re: Say What?"
cyclops
Member since:
2006-03-12

"Darwin is not FreeBSD, and *plenty* of Apple-developed drivers are open as well."

Sorry I was under the impression that.

Quote
"It supports the POSIX API by way of its FreeBSD lineage and can run a large number of programs written for various other Unix-like systems."
Source
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darwin_(operating_system)


I'm sorry I didn't realize their Airport drivers were now open.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[10]: Re: Say What?
by meianoite on Thu 12th Jul 2007 22:34 in reply to "RE[9]: Re: Say What?"
meianoite Member since:
2006-04-05

"It supports the POSIX API by way of its FreeBSD lineage and can run a large number of programs written for various other Unix-like systems."
Source
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darwin_(operating_system)


Wow, wikipedia, the undisputed source for accurate information.

By the way, they got things completely backwards. Apple could reuse part of the FreeBSD, NetBSD and OpenBSD userland because Darwin already supported the POSIX API through its (original) BSD 4.4-Lite heritage. The fact that not even today FreeBSD is feature-complete on PowerPCs is telling, don't you think?

And BTW, Apple has hired a decent share of FreeBSD developers, Jordan Hubbard included. And if you check the FreeBSD commit trees sometime, you might become aware of very interesting stuff.

Not to mention how Apple *never* refrained from crediting FreeBSD.
http://developer.apple.com/technotes/tn2002/tn2071.html

By the way, if you're really curious about the history of Mac OS X, Amit Singh actually knows what he talks about: http://www.kernelthread.com/mac/osx/history.html

I'm sorry I didn't realize their Airport drivers were now open.


I'm sorry I didn't realise Apple owns Atheros, Broadcom and others.


Edit: ... they got things ...

Edited 2007-07-12 22:38

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[11]: Re: Say What?
by cyclops on Thu 12th Jul 2007 23:02 in reply to "RE[10]: Re: Say What?"
cyclops Member since:
2006-03-12

"I'm sorry I didn't realize Apple owns Atheros, Broadcom and others."

And yet Linux has open source drivers for those.http://www.linuxwireless.org/en/users/Drivers and those drives came about becuase of *contributions* by companies.

Ironically the wikipedia entry agrees with you. I'm sure than freebsd would benefit more from having a *shared* tree, rather than a separate development, rather than a thank you.

Edited 2007-07-12 23:03

Reply Parent Score: 2