Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sat 14th Jul 2007 20:06 UTC, submitted by AdamW
KDE "PC users have volumes of information saved on their computers, most of it disconnected and disparate save for a basic directory system. The answer to connecting all the information into a local semantic Web of information is closer than you might think. Thanks to the open source NEPOMUK (Networked Environment for Personalized, Ontology-based Management of Unified Knowledge) effort, the Semantic Desktop isn't a dream; it's an emerging reality and will be here with the upcoming release of KDE 4 for the Linux desktop."
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RE[9]: I have been waiting...
by WereCatf on Mon 16th Jul 2007 10:32 UTC in reply to "RE[8]: I have been waiting..."
WereCatf
Member since:
2006-02-15


The problem isn't the file system per se. Most any file system can have filters added for extended attributes. The problem is in file formats. Some support them, some don't and some are implemented poorly (PDF).


Umm, it's not the files themselves which should have support for extended attributes..That would require modifying _every_ single filetype that's supposed to have any metadata at all. Not gonna happen. It's the filesystem which should handle metadata, that way the filetype wouldn't matter at all as metadata would be possible on any and every file.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Richard Dale Member since:
2005-07-22

Umm, it's not the files themselves which should have support for extended attributes..That would require modifying _every_ single filetype that's supposed to have any metadata at all. Not gonna happen. It's the filesystem which should handle metadata, that way the filetype wouldn't matter at all as metadata would be possible on any and every file.

What you say is perfectly correct, and file system level metadata would be good.

But the point of the semantic desktop is to use concepts from the semantic web such a RDF as a common meta data format, and held in a local triple store SPARQL end point that can be queried. Where the meta-data is held before it is extracted isn't important, because adaptor code can be written to extract it from all the existing file formats.

The semantic desktop builds on concepts from the semantic web, and this paper (which I'm still trying to understand), describes how they differ:

http://protege.stanford.edu/conference/2007/presentations/12.04_Cai...

The NEPOMUK Representational Language will allow you to describe the links between multiple RDF vocabularies that you might have in your metadata. And so you would be able to combine, say FOAF data about people, with VCARD data about business contact addresses for specific useful purposes.

Reply Parent Score: 3

DigitalAxis Member since:
2005-08-28

Well, speaking as someone who's lost my ratings and scores on my files in Amarok several times now due to reinstalls, etc, I worry about relying on metadata cached elsewhere. I mean, in the long run, I still know which songs in my collection I like and don't rely too heavily on Amarok's rating system... but supposing we were, this metadata would have to be stored somewhere.

I think what we eventually need is a filesystem wherin each file consists of a file and a hidden folder (or maybe just a data block, with a maximum size, to prevent abuse) that can contain a flexible amount and type of metadata specific to the file. I think that's what HFS+ and Reiser4 do, but that's not how Linux is set up to work. Yet, anyway.

Somewhere in all of this, of course, what metadata is connected with each file will have to be automated, but by then we'll need enough tags and categories that files can be properly categorized. My own music collection, again, is a mess. Genres don't always line up, though occasionally I go through them and try to fix the capitalization or remove a confusing type... Is it pop or alternative? Soundtrack, or Classical?

Edited 2007-07-16 16:28

Reply Parent Score: 2