Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 17th Jul 2007 14:38 UTC, submitted by mikemuch
Windows "Way back in November 2006, when Windows Vista went from beta to RTM, Microsoft's Jim Allchin suggested that users might not need an antivirus program, thanks to the new OS's stronger security features. While the statement was subsequently clarified until it lost all its meaning, the question remains: Do Vista users really need an antivirus program running in the background at all times?"
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Nice article
by kiz01 on Tue 17th Jul 2007 15:00 UTC
kiz01
Member since:
2005-07-06

Summary:

UAC may be super annoying but it can stop just about any program from installing making it an excellent security tool. It's so good that it could remove the need for an antivirus. Unfortunately, Joe User is really stupid and odds are he'll ignore the UAC messages and install the virus anyway.

Conclusion: The average user needs an antivirus because they are too ignorant to get along without one.

I think it really sums up the plight of the average user. They don't understand their computer, which makes them easy victims. They don't want to understand their computer, which insures that they continue to be easy victims. Therefore they need an antivirus program to clean up the messes they make.

Reply Score: 5

RE: Nice article
by baadger on Tue 17th Jul 2007 15:19 in reply to "Nice article"
baadger Member since:
2006-08-29

Personally I'd rather fix computer systems of friends and family when they get hit by the odd piece of nasty annoying adware than constantly 'check up' on their PC because Norton Shitority Suite 2015 and all the other RAM and I/O hungry gunk they have installed is making it run like muck. And I'm sure I'd be doing it less frequently too.

I have a friend with a beautiful 1k Core2/XP/2GB system which I recently had to wipe and reinstall because it was blue screening, and just generally running worse doing desktop tasks than my old Pentium II. It saddens me to see someone spend so much money on a system, for me to build it, install all they need and to see it fly, only to see the same desktop 3 months later with 17 system tray icons and the whole thing running like shit. The last thing he needed was resident AV.

On the Window's platform, the boundaries between viruses, spy and adware and just bad bloaty software with system wide negative effects is smearing and AV doesn't help.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: Nice article
by _mikk on Tue 17th Jul 2007 20:11 in reply to "Nice article"
_mikk Member since:
2005-10-19

Yeah it would be nice, now wouldn't it?

Users actually paying attention...
I mean it sounds like a great idea to me, or more like utopia *sigh*

People will either turn the damn thing off, or click "OK" every time.

I mean, in XP, by default (right after you install) you get asked whether or not you want to execute something you've just downloaded. Doesn't stop anybody, or any virus...

Oh well....

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Nice article
by marafaka on Tue 17th Jul 2007 21:24 in reply to "RE: Nice article"
marafaka Member since:
2006-01-03

How do you get along treating people like that? They did not buy their machines to run some woodo shiite but to fulfill a specific need. Do you think it's allright if salami crawls out of your fridge at night and eats your money just because you didn't buy and read the required 7 books about having a salami?

Every story has two sides and moronic developers / industry is the other site of this one.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Nice article
by tspears on Wed 18th Jul 2007 13:31 in reply to "RE: Nice article"
tspears Member since:
2006-05-22

Users actually paying attention...
I mean it sounds like a great idea to me, or more like utopia


I see it as job security more than a burden ;-)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Nice article
by kaiwai on Wed 18th Jul 2007 02:27 in reply to "Nice article"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Conclusion: The average user needs an antivirus because they are too ignorant to get along without one.


But that doesn't really get to the source of the problem. The problem isn't ignorance - we were all ignorant at one point in time about computers. The issue is what we did (versus what they didn't do) to address that problem.

Unfortunately ignorance is part of a bigger social issue in the world - look around. Society in general praises ignorance, as if it were something to be proud of - who gets more kudos, a 'book reading geek' or some muscle bound athlete who as think as two short planks.

Until people are willing to see that knowledge is a good thing to have, and learning for the sake of learning (rather than a job) is a great thing ti promote, we'll continue to have ignorant people who think they can get away with the bare minimum to be able to operate a computer effectively.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: Nice article
by jessta on Wed 18th Jul 2007 09:46 in reply to "Nice article"
jessta Member since:
2005-08-17

The thing is that Joe User shouldn't be installing stuff on a computer. He doesn't have the skills required so he shouldn't be doing it.

In the same way, Joe User shouldn't be cooking unless he knows about food poisoning and how to prevent it.

The problem is that the IT industry, in trying to sell it's products, promotes the idea that 'anyone can do it' and 'no learning nescessary'. No other industry does that to the extent that the IT industry does.

We created the 'idiot user', We brought this on ourselves and now we have to deal with it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Nice article
by PJBonoVox on Wed 18th Jul 2007 12:14 in reply to "RE: Nice article"
PJBonoVox Member since:
2006-08-14

I agree with a lot of what you say, but be careful who you call 'we'. I was much happier when only geeks (generally speaking) used computers, and I'm certainly not guilty of pedalling the computer life to non-geeks. I'm not being elitist, it was just 'better times' back then.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Nice article
by tryphcycle on Wed 18th Jul 2007 17:38 in reply to "RE: Nice article"
tryphcycle Member since:
2006-02-16

"We created the 'idiot user', We brought this on ourselves and now we have to deal with it."


Here is another one!

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Nice article
by tryphcycle on Wed 18th Jul 2007 17:35 in reply to "Nice article"
tryphcycle Member since:
2006-02-16

"UAC may be super annoying but it can stop just about any program from installing making it an excellent security tool. It's so good that it could remove the need for an antivirus. Unfortunately, Joe User is really stupid and odds are he'll ignore the UAC messages and install the virus anyway."


I love when PC know-it-alls talk about how stupid and ignorant "Joe user" is. Like they were never THAT guy! You arrogant PC dorks need to show some modesty and humility and stop acting like you are so f'n special because you can point and click better then the next guy! WE ALL started as Joe User!

In my experience, the dorks that act like this around less experienced computer people are the one that really dont know there ass from a hole in the ground!!!!

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Nice article
by Caspian on Wed 18th Jul 2007 17:44 in reply to "RE[2]: Nice article"
Caspian Member since:
2006-01-01

Hi! Welcome to osnews.

The difference between Joe user and the the "PC know-it-all" Is that there are many MANY people who refuse to learn, or do not wish to learn, and thus stay in their ignorant little blissfull world, going to all the porn sites on ie, and opening up all the attachments from their spam inbox.

The "PC know-it-all" isn't whom you are thinking of. You are thinking of the people who format more than once a year. A true "PC know-it-all" usually doesn't format their systems, usually controls large corporate networks, and usually isn't biased towards any operating system, and can use the big 3 equally as well.

By your logic, Le mons drivers should never be able to complain about people who are bad drivers, because they all started as average drivers.

Reply Parent Score: 2