Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 22nd Jul 2007 15:26 UTC
Windows Microsoft is planning to ship its next major version of Windows - known internally as version '7' - within roughly three years, CNET News.com has learned. The company discussed Windows 7 on Thursday at a conference for its field sales force in Orlando, Fla., according to sources close to the company. While the company provided few details, Windows 7, the next client version of the operating system, will be among the steps taken by Microsoft to establish a more predictable release schedule, according to sources. The company plans a more 'iterative' process of information disclosure to business customers and partners, sources said.
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RE[3]: interesseting
by powderblue on Sun 22nd Jul 2007 23:15 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: interesseting"
powderblue
Member since:
2007-07-22

Actually Thom your comment only shows how uninformed you are about Mac OS X. There is only one version of OS X and and only one set of drivers. That's the point he was trying to make. Now how does that compare with Windows where you need different drivers for the 32 bit and 64 bit versions. Of course you resort to your typical Apple bashing even when your wrong.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: interesseting
by TBPrince on Sun 22nd Jul 2007 23:31 in reply to "RE[3]: interesseting"
TBPrince Member since:
2005-07-06

The guy was trying to assert that having a single executable including both 32 and 64 bit code as something innovative (like universal binaries, for example), implying Windows cannot run 32 and 64bit code cannot run by Windows "side-by-side".

People who replied just established the reality of truth which is Windows can run 32bit and 64bit code side-by-side. While having both 32bit and 64bit code in same executable should be considered a superior way to do things, is beyond me.

Anyway, Thom is right when he says that Linux and OS X newbies usually don't know Windows as they pretend. For example, a Windows executable CAN include both 32bit and 64bit code when you develop against .NET framework. Visual Studio 2005+ can infacts output both in same EXE.

Linux and Mac people are usually highly misinformed about Windows, mostly as if they were all reading the same old forum dating back to 2002.

I remember a customer asking for a Linux dedicated server. I asked why not Windows and he said because he needed PHP and PHP doesn't run on Windows but only on Linux. Go figure...

Edited 2007-07-22 23:34

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[5]: interesseting
by jayson.knight on Sun 22nd Jul 2007 23:59 in reply to "RE[4]: interesseting"
jayson.knight Member since:
2005-07-06

"For example, a Windows executable CAN include both 32bit and 64bit code when you develop against .NET framework. Visual Studio 2005+ can infacts output both in same EXE."

Excellent point (modded up for that). Just to further expand on what TBPrince is saying here: VS 2005 has a 'Mixed Platforms' setting which basically compiles a binary that will figure out at runtime what platform it is running on, and JIT the appropriate bitness (or optimized instruction set, etc) for the code it needs to execute. You can basically just 'compile and forget about it.'

"I remember a customer asking for a Linux dedicated server. I asked why not Windows and he said because he needed PHP and PHP doesn't run on Windows but only on Linux."

It's amazing how many so called 'professional' technical folks have blinders on when it comes to other platforms. Let's face it, in this business if you decide to ignore Windows (or don't take the time to at least learn enough about it to appear educated), you're sure to go out of business real quick.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: interesseting
by lemur2 on Mon 23rd Jul 2007 01:35 in reply to "RE[4]: interesseting"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

People who replied just established the reality of truth which is Windows can run 32bit and 64bit code side-by-side.

...

For example, a Windows executable CAN include both 32bit and 64bit code when you develop against .NET framework. Visual Studio 2005+ can infacts output both in same EXE.


It is the drivers that is the issue. The hardware drivers for a 64-bit OS must be 64-bit drivers (the driver can still talk to 32-bit or lower hardware, but the driver code itself must be able to address all of the machines memory, and so the driver must be 64-bit). You can still run 32-bit application code in a sort of "virtualized" wrapper, but there will very likely be issues when your 32-bit code tries to get down and dirty with the hardware.

This issue is not constrained to Windows ... for any OS there is a "32-bit vs 64-bit divide".

The unique problem for Windows is only that it is the only major OS today where the OS vendor does not own the code for the majority of the hardware drivers.

Reply Parent Score: 2