Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 22nd Jul 2007 15:26 UTC
Windows Microsoft is planning to ship its next major version of Windows - known internally as version '7' - within roughly three years, CNET News.com has learned. The company discussed Windows 7 on Thursday at a conference for its field sales force in Orlando, Fla., according to sources close to the company. While the company provided few details, Windows 7, the next client version of the operating system, will be among the steps taken by Microsoft to establish a more predictable release schedule, according to sources. The company plans a more 'iterative' process of information disclosure to business customers and partners, sources said.
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MS becoming irrelevant......
by obsidian on Mon 23rd Jul 2007 07:17 UTC
obsidian
Member since:
2007-05-12

Slowly but surely, businesses are starting to wake up to the fact that they don't have to pay the "MS tax" in order to get decent software. ( In fact, they're much more likely to get good software if they *don't*... ).

Operating systems - Linux, the BSDs, (Haiku should be pretty useful in three years too).
Office software - OO.org, Gnumeric, Abiword etc.
Browser - Firefox, Konqueror.
Prog. languages - Python, Ruby, Haskell, Perl
... and so on.

If I were negotiating with MS, I'd get a BSD or Linux CD in my hand, and I'd eyeball the MS guy and say -
"Ok, sunshine - you have one minute. Where's the value-add??? Show me the value-add!"

There isn't any.

Heck, MS can't even seem to learn from Apple (who have based their OS on a FreeBSD kernel).

Ok sure, MS will still be making a **container-ship load** of money in three years (heck, in *10* years!).
But they're still on the long downhill slope towards being more and more irrelevant.

Edited 2007-07-23 07:28

Reply Score: 1

unoengborg Member since:
2005-07-06

If I were negotiating with MS, I'd get a BSD or Linux CD in my hand, and I'd eyeball the MS guy and say -
"Ok, sunshine - you have one minute. Where's the value-add??? Show me the value-add!"

There isn't any.


That may be true, if you are starting a new busines and have no previous ties.

If you already run windows in some form, he would show you training costs, costs for porting in house software, costs for converting old documents to new document formats. He would show you higher costs for hardware, as some dirt cheap hardware have no Linux/FreeBSD drivers. He would show you some select Linux apps that are not as good as the corresponding app for windows. (Yes, you can probably find examples of the opposite, but the normal windows user will not know this). He would point out that its harder to get certified administrators and that they probably would want higher salary.

Once you are hooked on windows, it actually can be quite expensive to get unhooked, and I'm sure that the Microsoft sales person will be very well trained in how to make this very clear to potential defectors.

If/When Linux get a desktop user base of around 10% or so, it will be very hard for Microsoft to stop it in the long run, as we by then can expect that lots of companies will port their desktop software to Linux and that hardware vendors will make sure that their hardware have proper Linux drivers. Dell starting to sell boxes with Linux preinstalled could be the starting point for this if they succeed and more hardware vendors follow.

However, this will likely not happen in the time frame for the next version of windows. So I think Microsoft shareholders can sleep well at night for a long time to come.

Reply Parent Score: 2