Linked by Eugenia Loli on Wed 1st Aug 2007 20:09 UTC
Talk, Rumors, X Versus Y If you're a Vista-wary Windows user who would rather switch than fight, should you move to a Linux distro or Apple's OS X? InformwationWeek asked a Mac fan and a Linux advocate to lead a guided tour of each OS.
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RE[3]: Linux vs. OS X
by funny_irony on Thu 2nd Aug 2007 04:48 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Linux vs. OS X"
funny_irony
Member since:
2007-03-07

I totally agree with you. With Linux, you must try to find out whether the distro can support the hardware.

Otherwise, you will end up installing 1001 distros of Linux and find the one that can work.

By the time you find one Linux distro that works, your hardware is obsolete.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE[4]: Linux vs. OS X
by lemur2 on Thu 2nd Aug 2007 04:49 in reply to "RE[3]: Linux vs. OS X"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I totally agree with you. With Linux, you must try to find out whether the distro can support the hardware.

Otherwise, you will end up installing 1001 distros of Linux and find the one that can work.

By the time you find one Linux distro that works, your hardware is obsolete.


FUD. Pure and utter FUD. You have been called on it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Linux vs. OS X
by UltraZelda64 on Thu 2nd Aug 2007 07:05 in reply to "RE[4]: Linux vs. OS X"
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

Actually... there is *some* truth to that. I've had a hell of a time with wireless cards, for example. A cheap D-Link USB dongle drove me insane... never got that thing to work on Linux, and just gave up on it. When I decided to replace the USB POS in my mom's computer, I printed out a list of supposedly "Linux-friendly" internal wireless card, and took it with me to Staples and Wal-Mart. I ended up finding a whopping ONE card, at Staples, that was on the "compatible" list and reportedly had the friendly "Ralink" chip. Exact brand and model number and everything.

Got home. Put it in. What happened? Didn't work. I'm down to a measly TWO distros--Ubuntu and PCLinuxOS--that work with this card, and nothing else. Turns out that this card actually has the Atheros chipset, instead of Ralink, requiring MadWifi and some binary-only driver... apparently they changed the card without changing the model number, or something, but I got screwed over. The machine's a cheap piece of crap with a Sempron and only 192MB memory, so obviously these two distros are not very impressive on it.

As for installing Madwifi and the binary blob myself... I've had enough headaches with just trying to figure out the problem and trying to get it work (nothing but failures), I honestly don't feel like screwing around with it any more. One thing's for sure: wireless card support needs to improve dramatically before a chip ever gets installed in my system (which is unlikely to begin with--wired seems more reliable). It's honestly got to be the biggest PITA I've ever experienced in computing, right up there with adware.

Also, I might as well add, wireless has also been one of the biggest annoyances in Windows, too. But at least I can get it working. Well, for the most part. Thankfully, because I connect using an ethernet cable, I can install any distro I please and (usually) get instant Internet connectivity. Overall, I prefer Linux, but this wifi crap prevents me from replacing Windows on all the computers in the house (only one is mine anyway).

Reply Parent Score: 2