Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 3rd Aug 2007 23:09 UTC
SkyOS SkyOS beta 6762 has been released. "SkyOS Beta 6762 is now available to download directly from the Beta Center. This build features the new Viewer, a huge performance increase, 36 additional API Classes, updated libraries, a new font alpha blending method, 280+ fixed bugs including critical boot bug fixes."
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RE[4]: FAQ
by Ford Prefect on Sun 5th Aug 2007 15:07 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: FAQ"
Ford Prefect
Member since:
2006-01-16

The "ever changing" APIs is a myth. Most even stone age programs still compile on new systems without any patch needed.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: FAQ
by edwdig on Mon 6th Aug 2007 15:31 in reply to "RE[4]: FAQ"
edwdig Member since:
2005-08-22

The "ever changing" APIs is a myth. Most even stone age programs still compile on new systems without any patch needed.

Not true at all. You're only able to compile older apps if you load your system up with ancient versions of libraries. That's not API compatibility, that's just the ability for different APIs to coexist. Very big difference.

Let's also not forget the horrible disregard for binary compatibility on Linux. GCC alone breaks all binary compatibility every few releases.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[6]: FAQ
by Ford Prefect on Mon 6th Aug 2007 19:43 in reply to "RE[5]: FAQ"
Ford Prefect Member since:
2006-01-16

Your posting sounds ignorant to me. I got not the same impression than you, but still I know what I talk about, too. And to me it seems that most open source APIs stay compatible for a long time. Even if there occur changes, they are mostly minor ones and can easily patched.

Your post about binary compatibility is senseless. The disregard of it is anything else than "horrible". It doesn't matter. Next, gcc stays binary compatible a long, long, long time. It's only g++ that broke often recently.

On Windows I want binary compatibility, because I would need it! On a open source operating system it's nothing more than a hindrance to evolution of the software.

But now to go one step further: API/ABI compatibility on Windows as the outstanding proprietary platform to compare with, is horrible too -- talking about libraries! Most programs install their own version of the needed libs just exactly for this reason. And the mess goes so far that Windows has extra mechanisms builtin to restore overwritten librarys automatically!

Still, if some error is detected in a rather old lib from MS, like the wmf (?) image exploit last year, people start to find this lib is shipped with dozens of applications they would never dream of. This wouldn't happen on a open source system, apart from your "API incompatibility" most programs manage to use the system-wide libs instead of static linkage etc.

Reply Parent Score: 2