Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 9th Aug 2007 21:11 UTC, submitted by rx182
Mono Project When Microsoft chief software architect Ray Ozzie unveiled Silverlight at MIX07, he vowed that it would be a cross-platform technology. It appears as if the software giant is making good on that pledge: SD Times has learned that some of Microsoft's top developers have provided technical guidance for a Linux implementation of Silverlight.
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RE[3]: Maybe...
by butters on Thu 9th Aug 2007 21:56 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Maybe..."
butters
Member since:
2005-07-08

Ultimately I hope that Microsoft realizes that they should just start hacking on Mono/Moonlight. It's a development framework that faces serious competition from Java/JavaFX and Flash. They need to make it ubiquitous, and they need to be make it cross-platform.

What does Microsoft get out of having their own proprietary implementation? They don't sell it. They don't want to keep it to themselves. They just want developers to use it. Sounds like a job for free software. <queue theme music>

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: Maybe...
by kaiwai on Thu 9th Aug 2007 22:10 in reply to "RE[3]: Maybe..."
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Ultimately I hope that Microsoft realizes that they should just start hacking on Mono/Moonlight. It's a development framework that faces serious competition from Java/JavaFX and Flash. They need to make it ubiquitous, and they need to be make it cross-platform.

What does Microsoft get out of having their own proprietary implementation? They don't sell it. They don't want to keep it to themselves. They just want developers to use it. Sounds like a job for free software. <queue theme music>


Sounds like a good idea - if I were CEO of Microsoft (everyones favourite parlour game), I would completely open and standardise the .NET framework, allow anyone to implement it - create tools that are 100% .NET to allow it to run on other platforms.

We need more choice; right now Flash is the only thing- everyone gets screwed, and no one benefits from that monopoly.

Sun also need to get their act together; create easy to use development tools for JavaFX so that the cafe late drinking set who are fluent in Photoshop can sit down and put together a rich internet experience with minimum effort and learning.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Maybe...
by google_ninja on Thu 9th Aug 2007 22:46 in reply to "RE[3]: Maybe..."
google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

MS is always big on mindshare. The best silverlight tools will always be on windows, they sell the tools and sell the platform.

Just out of curiosity, have you actually seen silverlight?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MsNRFKsGLbA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JEUrQEj6Sd4&mode=related&search=

It completely destroys flash when it comes to rich application design in a web browser. JavaFX (and apollo from adobe, which you didnt mention) Are a similar idea, but for the desktop. Whether those take off or not is anyones guess, as it would be a new way off looking at desktop application development. But Silverlight is the first truely elegant solution I have seen to the web application problem. I would still use flash for animations, but that is about it. From rich application functionality to content delivery, Silverlight is on a whole other playing field.

Not to start a flame war or anything, but we were just arguing about this in another thread like, yesterday, so I wanted to point out that it is the MS/Novell deal that makes the port to linux a reality. Patent indemnification aside, the deal is what will allow linux users access to something which is quite likely to really take off in the next few years.

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[5]: Maybe...
by butters on Thu 9th Aug 2007 23:31 in reply to "RE[4]: Maybe..."
butters Member since:
2005-07-08

First of all, I'm fully aware of Silverlight's technical merit. Look at my other post in this thread.

Sure, Microsoft could make it so that the premium Silverlight development tools are only available for Windows. Then they tie the developers to Windows. But that won't get the consumers, which are the vast majority of the market.

A web development platform can't be used to sell Windows to consumers. As long as the content is available on other platforms, it becomes a non-issue for consumers. And Microsoft needs the content to be available on other platforms. Otherwise Flash wins.

But more importantly, the MS/Novell deal probably does nothing to change the Moonlight/Mono patent situation. It specifically excludes "Clone Products", including (but not limited to) Wine, OpenOffice, and OpenXchange. Mono could very well be considered a Clone Product as well, and therefore it could fall outside the bounds of the patent covenant.

I'm telling you, the patent covenants are NOT what they seem. The Foundry Products clause is even more troubling...

Reply Parent Score: 8

RE[5]: Maybe...
by notig on Fri 10th Aug 2007 00:20 in reply to "RE[4]: Maybe..."
notig Member since:
2006-10-07

Hey I agree... but there is nothing stopping the OSS community from making their own tools. It seems like so much fear and FUD is being spread around it though that people are hesitant.

For myself I will be using moonlight in the future and if people will want to use my program then they can get the browser plug in for it when it is ready

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Maybe...
by jayson.knight on Thu 9th Aug 2007 23:03 in reply to "RE[3]: Maybe..."
jayson.knight Member since:
2005-07-06

"They don't sell it."

Products developed on top of the .Net framework sell Windows licenses though. So in the end it actually does lead to direct sales, which is why they'll never officially support .Net on any other platform...in essence it would be a public admission undermining their own platform which doesn't make any sense from a business standpoint.

Reply Parent Score: 5