Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 9th Aug 2007 21:11 UTC, submitted by rx182
Mono Project When Microsoft chief software architect Ray Ozzie unveiled Silverlight at MIX07, he vowed that it would be a cross-platform technology. It appears as if the software giant is making good on that pledge: SD Times has learned that some of Microsoft's top developers have provided technical guidance for a Linux implementation of Silverlight.
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RE[2]: Maybe...
by lemur2 on Fri 10th Aug 2007 03:31 UTC in reply to "RE: Maybe..."
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

Moonlight is free software. We can redistribute it freely. We can fork it. We can study it. We can add cool functionality. That makes it different from Flash or any other proprietary development framework available for Linux.


... except for, of course, the standard for animation of web graphics, which is SVG and SMIL.

http://www.w3.org/TR/SVG11/animate.html
http://srufaculty.sru.edu/david.dailey/svg/SVGAnimations.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SVG_animation

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Maybe...
by Nelson on Fri 10th Aug 2007 04:34 in reply to "RE[2]: Maybe..."
Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

What's wrong with not going against a standard if you're willing to provide technical help on implementing your platform? If anything, it sounds like competition.

Why should established standards be the end of the road? That does nothing but stagnate innovation.

I don't have a problem with people implementing new things if they provide technical documentation or support.

Moonlight is open source, and like mentioned above it can be studied and improved.

The standards were created to go against propriatary platforms who provide no documentation or technical assistance.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[4]: Maybe...
by Finalzone on Fri 10th Aug 2007 08:45 in reply to "RE[3]: Maybe..."
Finalzone Member since:
2005-07-06

Keyword: standard open format much like Open Document Format or even HTML where anyone from Closed to Open source can compete on an equal field.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Maybe...
by Beta on Fri 10th Aug 2007 08:47 in reply to "RE[3]: Maybe..."
Beta Member since:
2005-07-06

Is it really competition if it is going to be force-fed via Windows Update to all Windows boxes?

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Maybe...
by lemur2 on Fri 10th Aug 2007 11:40 in reply to "RE[3]: Maybe..."
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

What's wrong with not going against a standard if you're willing to provide technical help on implementing your platform? If anything, it sounds like competition.

Why should established standards be the end of the road? That does nothing but stagnate innovation.


Here is a set of links which explain the reasons for having independent web standards, as opposed to competing commercial *cough* "standards".

http://www.w3.org/Consortium/
http://www.w3.org/2007/uwa/
http://www.w3.org/2001/di/
http://www.w3.org/2001/di/#waDI
http://www.w3.org/Consortium/Patent-Policy-20040205/#sec-Licensing

Edited 2007-08-10 11:41

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Maybe...
by unoengborg on Fri 10th Aug 2007 14:15 in reply to "RE[3]: Maybe..."
unoengborg Member since:
2005-07-06

Why should established standards be the end of the road? That does nothing but stagnate innovation.


Because standards make interoperability better, and that lowers the cost to the user. Standards doesn't prevent anybody from doing new stuff, quite the contrary. People can still innovate to make software that is faster, less memory hungry, or easier to maintain and still stay standard compliant, and standards doesn't prevent anybody to invent things that not yet are standardized. Standards give developers the opportunity to stand on the sholders of others when they develop new things.

Another thing, standards evolve too. E.g. IPv4->IPv6, HTML2->HTML3->HTML4... Its just that they tend to evolve in a way where people are not left out. Sometimes even keeping up with the standard requires a lot of innovation. As far as I know there is not a single web browser that fully comply with all w3c standards. If such thing actually was created my guess is that the press would praise it as the most innovative thing since sliced bread.

In other words, doing standardized things in a standard way, gives more time to innovate things not yet standardized. Just imagine how much time web developers would save if all browsers used the same DOM tree structure, the same tags and attributes and fully support css...

Reply Parent Score: 4