Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 15th Aug 2007 21:37 UTC
Novell and Ximian In the wake of last week's ruling that Novell, and not SCO, controls the copyrights covering UNIX, Novell is reassuring Unix users that it has no plans to follow in SCO's footsteps. Given that the company is no longer in the business of selling UNIX, it has no reason to pursue any copyright claims.
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jakesdad
Member since:
2005-12-28

why would things get tough for Novell in the future?

If anything happens IBM would just buy them. IBM already has one foot in the door there anyway.

Reply Parent Score: 1

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

"""
If anything happens IBM would just buy them.
"""

Is there an echo in here? I think I just heard a phrase from 2003. IBM would just buy them?

If the community trusts Novell so much, we might *really* be in trouble! ;-)

Edit: And if the community really trusts IBM, in the long run, we're sunk.

Edited 2007-08-16 00:19

Reply Parent Score: 4

IanSVT Member since:
2005-07-06

And if the community really trusts IBM, in the long run, we're sunk.


And beyond that the Novell user/admin community as well. Not that I think it would happen, but IBM outright purchasing Novell would be a death blow to a legitimate competitor to Microsoft in the directory services and identity management market. I couldn't see IBM doing anything outside of striping and destroying. That seems to be the common outcome when company A buys company B.

Reply Parent Score: 2

watchingeyes Member since:
2007-05-04

You're either trying to spread FUD or are downright ignorant of the law. As I (and any lawyer worth their salt) will maintain, there is nothing to fear from Novell suddenly owning Unix (...even though they have for years now).

The code is GPL'd. BOTH SCO AND NOVELL have licensed it as such. For years on end! End of story. They have explicitly granted permission, to the extent that they are legally able to give it (as in only to the parts of Linux they own the copyrights to), for anyone to copy and modify it under the terms of the GPL without requiring any permission. No Judge will let them profit off of a license and then turn around and ignore it when the going gets tough (which SCO will find out in IBM vs SCO shortly...) The doctrines of license, waiver, estoppel, laches, etc etc are all there specifically to PREVENT this kind of behaviour.

It's a basic principle of copyright law. You can't merely revoke a license because you change your mind, unless the license contains a clause allowing you to do so. The GPL contains no such clause.

Reply Parent Score: 2

butters Member since:
2005-07-08

IBM won't buy a Linux vendor. Let me provide some insight into IBM's corporate culture. This is a company that watches its partners and competitors come and go over the years while it remains the iconic leader of business technology. If Novell fails, it will be survived by other Linux vendors. If Linux fails, it will be survived by other operating systems.

The industry will change, and IBM will float with the currents. The only thing that can harm IBM is sticking to its guns when everybody else is moving on. If Novell's time is up, then IBM will move on along with everybody else. They already made their bet-the-company move back in the 60s. They don't need to do it ever again.

Reply Parent Score: 7

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

"""
They already made their bet-the-company move back in the 60s.
"""

What was that move? I was a toddler back then and I guess I missed it. :-)

Reply Parent Score: 2

elsewhere Member since:
2005-07-13

IBM won't buy a Linux vendor. Let me provide some insight into IBM's corporate culture. This is a company that watches its partners and competitors come and go over the years while it remains the iconic leader of business technology. If Novell fails, it will be survived by other Linux vendors. If Linux fails, it will be survived by other operating systems.


Novell isn't a linux vendor. They're a well established vendor of network/directory/management software solutions that also happens to distribute linux based solutions. The netware side of the business may be in decline, but there is still a significant install base and Novell has their hooks into many large enterprises around the world. Given the fact that IBM is Novell's largest reseller and that IBM is determined to expand their managed services offering in every which direction they can, I don't think a Novell acquisition would be out of the question. Plus they already have a not insignificant capital investment in Novell. It's either that or risk it dropping into somebody else's hands, say HP or Sun. Or worse.

But as to what would happen with the SUSE portion of the business, you raise a good point because I doubt IBM really wants to play there. But who knows? They've never forgiven RH for the JBoss acquisition and Oracle is beating the linux drum, so it might not be that far fetched.

Reply Parent Score: 2

google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

Good post as usual butters. However, IBM bet the company again fairly recently, moving from a hardware company to an "eSolutions" company. This is why Linux is such a big deal to them, it is an OS they don't have to pay to build, and their clients don't have to pay to use. Sure they contribute, but the development effort they put in is a fraction of what it takes to roll and maintain your own OS. This is also why AIX has been languishing for so long.

Reply Parent Score: 4