Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 1st Sep 2005 14:24 UTC, submitted by Tyr.
In the News Two research reports sponsored by IBM argue that Linux is less expensive to buy and operate than Windows or Unix. The first paper claims Linux is 40% less expensive than a comparable x86-based Windows server and 54% less than a comparable Sparc-based Solaris server. The second that using Linux has "Second Stage Benefits" such as attracting IT workers, among whome open source is increasingly popular.
Thread beginning with comment 26473
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Solaris?
by kamper on Thu 1st Sep 2005 19:58 UTC
kamper
Member since:
2005-08-20

I know they probably chose Solaris as a representative for old unix for good reasons, but the story would have impressed more if IBM had said "Linux is better than AIX".

Reply Score: 1

RE: Solaris?
by butters on Sun 4th Sep 2005 14:42 in reply to "Solaris?"
butters Member since:
2005-07-08

"I know they probably chose Solaris as a representative for old unix for good reasons, but the story would have impressed more if IBM had said "Linux is better than AIX"."

I think I'm the only IBMer in the AIX division that says that. I don't argue that based on the technical merits of the platforms, AIX on pSeries beats the pants of anything Linux runs on, but based on momentum. The free software community has leveraged the collaborative power of the internet to make software engineering a downhill battle. There's simply no way that AIX can keep up with the development of Linux in the long run. It's already starting to happen. Xen can failover an apache server in less than 200ms. IBM recently purchased a company called Meiosys to bring this same technology to AIX. Linux (and Solaris even more) is starting to push on AIX, and the effect is not great for AIX. AIX can only be the stable, reliable, iron-clad UNIX it's supposed to be because most of the code is mature and extensively tested in the field. What happens when customers start demanding new features? The diffs become large, and the chance for destabilization increases.

The only OS development team in the world that can consistently and relentlessly add new features while continuing to improve overall software quality is the open source software community (which makes up more than Linux, of course). No proprietary team has enough manpower, testing resources, or mindshare to do this, and typically management gets in the way as well. The only reason for management in software development is for directing projects and making efficient use of manpower. When anyone in the world can contribute, there is no need for management. The cream can float to the top.

Linux isn't better than AIX at what AIX does best, but Linux is the fastest growing operating system (kernel) on the planet. And when the fastest growing OS is OSS, it isn't going to stop accelerating, either.

Reply Parent Score: 1