Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 20th Aug 2007 19:20 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems "A new startup out of MIT emerged from stealth mode today to announce that they're shipping a 64-core processor for the embedded market. The company, called Tilera, was founded by Dr. Anat Agarwal, the MIT professor behind the famous and venerable Raw project on which Tilera's first product, the TILE64 processor, is based. Tilera's director of marketing, Bob Dowd, told Ars that TILE64 represents a "sea change in the computing industry", and the company's CEO isn't shy about pitching the chip as the "first significant new chip architectural development in a decade". So let's take an initial look at what was announced about TILE64 today, with further information to follow as it becomes available."
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the problem...
by gelosilente on Tue 21st Aug 2007 07:38 UTC
gelosilente
Member since:
2006-08-13

...iss the software and the adoption.
actually we have powerpc and sparc, but open source movement simply ingnore them.
since x86 will remain yje only reference, new and good cpu will fail.

Reply Score: 1

RE: the problem...
by Papper on Tue 21st Aug 2007 11:44 in reply to "the problem..."
Papper Member since:
2007-08-13

This clearly isn't meant as an competitor for x86 or anything similair. It has other applications.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: the problem...
by kaiwai on Tue 21st Aug 2007 16:18 in reply to "the problem..."
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

SPARC has been open for over 20 years, the problem is that Intel and/or AMD are unwilling to swallow their pride and adopt an alternative. Lets be completely honest, if Intel spent as much money creating Core (and Core 2) and developed a processor with that level of efficiency with a SPARC ISA sitting ontop it would have the best of both worlds. Open standards processor that is rocket fast.

The problem is that unless it gets the volume, development and more importantly, backing of Microsoft, its doomed to be a niche in the computer market. Unfortunately, whether it runs Windows plus applications dictates whether it succeeds of fails in the marketplace of mainstream desktops and servers.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: the problem...
by psychicist on Wed 22nd Aug 2007 06:40 in reply to "RE: the problem..."
psychicist Member since:
2007-01-27

The problem is that unless it gets the volume, development and more importantly, backing of Microsoft, its doomed to be a niche in the computer market. Unfortunately, whether it runs Windows plus applications dictates whether it succeeds of fails in the marketplace of mainstream desktops and servers.


Is that really so? I think now that Sun is committed to Solaris and Linux on both x86 and SPARC and considering the improvements both operating systems are seeing, it will not be too long before these will be credible alternatives to the establishment, in fact they already are for most people.

I'm typing this on my Fu Long MIPS system and it feels and works just as fine as on my x86 system except for proprietary things such as Flash, which I would rather do without.

I have ported Slackware 12.0 to SPARC as well over the last few weeks and apart from Xorg problems with the Permedia II card because of missing multi-domain PCI support it works very well already.

What we're heading for is an era where you can choose any hardware and any operating system you want. Microsoft's support of x86, which was once to their advantage, has turned into a significant disadvantage because all their own software and that of third parties is wedded to the architecture.

Reply Parent Score: 1