Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 23rd Aug 2007 17:17 UTC, submitted by Oliver
Talk, Rumors, X Versus Y "In this article, I'll compare Ubuntu 7.04 with the upcoming release of PC-BSD 1.4. Having used both operating systems extensively, PC-BSD is the one I recommend and the one I install in desktop environments. If you've used Ubuntu before, but haven't tried PC-BSD, give it a try. The increase in responsiveness (i.e., everything seems to just run faster) and ease-of-use will surprise you."
Thread beginning with comment 265294
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: Richness
by Core Duo on Thu 23rd Aug 2007 18:29 UTC in reply to "Richness"
Core Duo
Member since:
2007-06-24

Ubuntu is more rich in features than PC-BSD

Could you elaborate? For me, it seems PC-BSD has too many options in its System menu. Too much stuff to my taste.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Richness
by hraq on Thu 23rd Aug 2007 21:58 in reply to "RE: Richness"
hraq Member since:
2005-07-06

One feature which is missing in PC-BSD is that their different versions are with different taste for hardware. I mean some versions will work on a specific hardware, then if you update the kernel or the the whole OS it won't work at all on the same hardware!

Installer of PC-BSD is so primitive and the partitioning tool associated with it makes it like a joke. One time during my testing on one of their versions; their partitioning software made a horrible mistake with the BIOS by using a wrong data access feature CHS and LBA rendering the desk unaccessable at the end of installation process; with the message Press F1..
So features of the OS doesn't mean only OS feature, but OS environment features, which includes Applications written for that OS.

And If I need to use even faster more stable OS than Ubuntu, I would choose Sun Solaris; but as we know software for x86 solaris are close to none.

Take Azureus as an example:
1. Linux supports it perfectly
2. Windows crashes it like a smackdown friday session
3. Solaris must be SPARC or compile your code on x86
4. PC-BSD doesn't work fine beyond 15 minutes complaining of networking stack problems

With Ubuntu and RHEL I was able to reach 700kbps download speed; on PC-BSD I achieved only 50! and thats the only service I ran and the only thing I have burdened the system with.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Richness
by Core Duo on Thu 23rd Aug 2007 22:11 in reply to "RE[2]: Richness"
Core Duo Member since:
2007-06-24

rendering the desk unaccessable

If you don't have access to your desk, try to enter by the window.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Richness
by Morgan on Fri 24th Aug 2007 03:31 in reply to "RE[2]: Richness"
Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Take Azureus as an example:
1. Linux supports it perfectly
2. Windows crashes it like a smackdown friday session


That's very interesting. My personal experience with Azureus is the exact opposite: On Windows it is flawless but on Linux it crashes and locks up a lot. The only thing I can think of is that it doesn't like the java that ships with Ubuntu. Either way, Azureus is too bloated for me; I just use uTorrent on both platforms -- under Wine on Linux of course.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Richness
by google_ninja on Sat 25th Aug 2007 16:37 in reply to "RE[2]: Richness"
google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

And If I need to use even faster more stable OS than Ubuntu, I would choose Sun Solaris; but as we know software for x86 solaris are close to none.

Take Azureus as an example:
1. Linux supports it perfectly
2. Windows crashes it like a smackdown friday session
3. Solaris must be SPARC or compile your code on x86
4. PC-BSD doesn't work fine beyond 15 minutes complaining of networking stack problems

With Ubuntu and RHEL I was able to reach 700kbps download speed; on PC-BSD I achieved only 50! and thats the only service I ran and the only thing I have burdened the system with.


Azureus is a java app. First of all, that means no real compiling, secondly, any differences on different platforms have to do with how good a job SUN did on the JVM for that platform, not how good the platform is at supporting applications. The bytecode itself is the same no matter where you run it.

Reply Parent Score: 2