Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 29th Aug 2007 00:16 UTC, submitted by irbis
Multimedia, AV "With the release of Windows Vista, using your PC to watch and record TV has become a whole lot easier. Now, for the first time, Windows Media Center comes bundled with Home Premium and Ultimate versions of the standard Desktop operating system. However, Vista is pricey, and its form and function are of course dictated by Microsoft. If you want full control over your Home Theater PC, and don't want to have to pay Microsoft for it, then Linux is a more than capable alternative base for building a system of your own."
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Call me when everything is legit on Linux
by stephanem on Wed 29th Aug 2007 00:44 UTC
stephanem
Member since:
2006-01-11

In the mean time, you want people to obey GPL, then you better start obeying MP3, DVDCSS, AACS and AC3 licenses.

I don't see anybody ponying up money to purchase "Real" licenses and provide them to the Linux Media Center users.

Reply Score: 2

tristan Member since:
2006-02-01

In the mean time, you want people to obey GPL, then you better start obeying MP3, DVDCSS, AACS and AC3 licenses.

I don't see anybody ponying up money to purchase "Real" licenses and provide them to the Linux Media Center users


1) Software patents (and thus the requirement to purchase licences for those patents) aren't recognised in large parts of the world

2) For those unfortunate places where they are, a combination of http://shop.fluendo.com and any GStreamer-based media player (e.g. Elisa) should keep you happy.

Reply Parent Score: 10

google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

1) Software patents (and thus the requirement to purchase licences for those patents) aren't recognised in large parts of the world


if you use the package w32codecs on your system, you are violating a liscence agreement, I don't care where you live. It is a redistribution of dlls copied from commercial programs, violating several liscence restrictions. There are other options which are legal however, such as ffmpeg, or vlc.

DeCSS is legal in a few places (like sweden), but it illegal in most countries, not because of how it cracks encryption, but because of the implicit agreement you agree to when you buy a commercial DVD.

If you live in america, or a country with strong trade relations with america, there is only one option for DVD playback on linux, and that is LDVD.

Last point, to the best of my knowledge there is no option, legal or otherwise to play HD content on linux, and due to insane DRM requirements that the movie industry is putting on all HD playback, I doubt we will ever see anything legal in that department.

Just because you live in the EU, doesn't make you exempt from the DVD stuff, it just makes you exempt from the mp3 stuff.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Almafeta Member since:
2007-02-22

1) Software patents (and thus the requirement to purchase licences for those patents) aren't recognised in large parts of the world


By 'large parts of the world,' I think you mean 'bloggers.'

Reply Parent Score: 2

sbergman27 Member since:
2005-07-24

stephanem,

The real problem is that the whole patent system is screwed. How can we have a decent conversation on patent licensing when things are so frecked up?

But as things stand, and speaking as a Linux advocate, you have a good point.

It's a mess. Distros do need to make sure that licensing is in order. Grass roots projects need to either avoid shipping patented codecs or pass the liability on to the end user, as MollyC (Molly Cieslinski?) has pointed out, regarding VLC, on a number of occasions.

Messy, messy, messy.

But this industry is always in a bit of a mess, isn't it? Greed prevails over the general welfare... again. ;-)

Edited 2007-08-29 01:19

Reply Parent Score: 5

BSDfan Member since:
2007-03-14

Again, software patents are some crazy ass American concept.

Countries, such as my own.. are free from such nonsense.

Thus, I consider your post null and void. ;-)

Reply Parent Score: 6

wakeupneo Member since:
2005-07-06

"I don't see anybody ponying up money to purchase "Real" licenses and provide them to the Linux Media Center users."

Yeah...like the "95%" market share of Windows users are 100% legitimate...gimme a break. Time to get off that high horse of yours and face reality.

And for what it's worth, thank god I live in a country that doesn't buy into this software patent nonsense...

Reply Parent Score: 5

MollyC Member since:
2006-07-04

"In the mean time, you want people to obey GPL, then you better start obeying MP3, DVDCSS, AACS and AC3 licenses.

I don't see anybody ponying up money to purchase "Real" licenses and provide them to the Linux Media Center users."


Well, the OSS model seems to be to force the burden of obtaining "real" licenses onto the user.
For example, VideoLAN says the following regarding their VLC media player:
http://wiki.videolan.org/Frequently_Asked_Questions#What_about_pers...
"Some of the codecs distributed with VLC are patented and require you to pay royalties to their licensors. These are mostly the MPEG style codecs.

With many products the producer pays the license body (in this case MPEG LA) so the user (commercial or personal) does not have to take care of this. VLC (and ffmpeg and libmpeg2 which it uses in most of these cases) cannot do this because they are Free and Open Source implementations of these codecs. The software is not sold and therefore the end-user becomes responsible for complying to the licensing and royalty requirements. You will need to contact the licensor on how to comply to these licenses.

This goes for playing a DVD with VLC for your personal joy ($2.50 one time payment to MPEG LA) as well as for using VLC for streaming a live event in MPEG-4 over the Internet. "


Of course, we all know that almost no user of VLC takes time to obtain the licenses, so the above statement might be accompanied by a wink-wink of the eye.

Reply Parent Score: 5

Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Call me when U.S law applies to other countries.

Reply Parent Score: 4

DirtyHarry Member since:
2006-01-31

Well.... in my worst nightmares that call must be made in the near future ;-)

Reply Parent Score: 2

abraxas Member since:
2005-07-07

In the mean time, you want people to obey GPL, then you better start obeying MP3, DVDCSS, AACS and AC3 licenses.

Oh give me a break. What about all those people who download VLC or codec packs based on free software to run on their Windows machines? The whole codec situation is a mess and most people don't have legit licenses to all of their own codecs. As for decss it was a necessity at the time because software companies refused to make DVD playing software for Linux. Personally I would love if all codecs in general use were open but that's not the case so I am going to do what I have to to get my media to work. I didn't choose to use crappy codecs like mp3. That choice was made for me. When I encode my own media I use free codecs. They are usually higher quality anyway.

I don't see anybody ponying up money to purchase "Real" licenses and provide them to the Linux Media Center users.

http://www.fluendo.com/

Reply Parent Score: 2