Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 7th Sep 2007 21:03 UTC
AMD The news already got out yesterday, but now it's official: AMD will open the specifications to its graphics chips. "AMD announced on Sept. 7 a major strategic change in open-source graphic processors support. The company announced it would provide open-source information and a development package supporting the ATI RadeonHD 2000 series ATI Radeon X1000 series of graphics processing units on Linux desktops." The new information is that AMD will partner with Novell's SUSE team.
Thread beginning with comment 269691
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
RE: What about games?
by WarpKat on Fri 7th Sep 2007 21:52 UTC in reply to "What about games?"
WarpKat
Member since:
2006-02-06

"Doesn't this portend a great opportunity for new, exciting 3D games on Linux? Y'all are all work and no play. I can't believe nobody mentioned this yet! That alone will provide a boost to the desktop market."

I whole-heartedly agree. One of the biggest selling points of Windows for people who are into it is the fact that games and games development is much easier on Windows due to the common interfaces and unobstructed support of the hardware on this platform. Having the same on other OS' with OpenGL will now open the doors for more games to come out for it and without much fuss so far as the system itself will support it, not to mention the potential for true cross-platform development.

What works on one should work on the other with minimal changes or adaptations.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: What about games?
by Ventajou on Fri 7th Sep 2007 23:02 in reply to "RE: What about games?"
Ventajou Member since:
2006-10-31

Actually the biggest selling point is that Windows has such a huge install base. Which is why the Macs are still so much behind in games even though it's a pretty coherent environment.

That and the fact that it also costs money to have linux developers in your team in addition.

It's a big commitment for a company to decide to write a linux version of their game and apparently only a handful of them think it's worth it.

Cash is basically the main driving force there.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: What about games?
by JonathanBThompson on Sat 8th Sep 2007 00:49 in reply to "RE[2]: What about games?"
JonathanBThompson Member since:
2006-05-26

I think you're partially correct about your assessment as to why the big 3D games aren't likely to ever end up (in meaningful numbers) on Linux, outside of the larger install base of Windows (where most gamers are by numbers) is that people using "free" operating systems seem to be more demanding that all their applications (including games) are "free" as well, and with the extremely huge development costs of a lot of modern games, that just doesn't rate very high on business sense for a game developer to release games onto a platform that has (right or wrong) the reputation of having users generally not willing to pay for their software. Of course, after they've milked all the first wave of buyers (generally on Windows) and there's no more meaningful new sales on Windows, perhaps you might make a case that it's good PR to do a Linux release, and maybe it is good PR, but that'd have to be an easily-ported game to make it worth that much.

However, there are some types of games (WoW, EQ) that I could see having it be irrelevant as to what the platform is, or even if people are willing to buy the binary itself, because they require a subscription to play the game over the network. In that case, it's less a technical reason than the Windows platform being the biggest platform (though that's still true) and largely then devolves into testing with all the various mutations of Linux, which can get expensive to do proper installation and play-testing on.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: What about games?
by Googol on Sat 8th Sep 2007 07:00 in reply to "RE: What about games?"
Googol Member since:
2006-11-24

I gave up hope for Linux gaming - and that is not because I am already waiting for a decade ;)

If you check the latest game developments and listen to people like Carmack, there is a clear shift away even from the Windows-PC. The game developers have a focus on consoles and they will not optimise for Windows-PC in the future. That makes Linux and OSX even more of an after thought in games development than it used to be. And before you'll see someone port to Linux, you'll see a Mac-port.
I am not saying it cannot be done, I am saying it is ever more unlikely you'll find someone who's willing to do it.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: What about games?
by psychicist on Sat 8th Sep 2007 07:38 in reply to "RE[2]: What about games?"
psychicist Member since:
2007-01-27

The game developers have a focus on consoles and they will not optimise for Windows-PC in the future. That makes Linux and OSX even more of an after thought in games development than it used to be. And before you'll see someone port to Linux, you'll see a Mac-port.


I think it's a really good thing that game development is shifting from the Windows PC to the consoles. That means more OpenGL code is being written (Wii, PS3) and less DirectX. This will make it a lot easier to port these games to either Linux, Solaris, FreeBSD or Mac OS X.

And if this move makes the PC obsolete as a gaming platform for both Windows and Linux/Mac users I am fine with that too. I will buy one of the OpenGL consoles and play my games there.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: What about games?
by Almindor on Sat 8th Sep 2007 09:35 in reply to "RE[2]: What about games?"
Almindor Member since:
2006-01-16

Actually late games are ported to linux sooner than to Mac. I've seen at least 3 commercial games ported to linux with "Mac beta, ETA unknown".

But you're right on the consoles.

Reply Parent Score: 1