Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 5th Sep 2005 13:31 UTC, submitted by DittoBox
Features, Office On 2nd September 2005 Sun announced the retirement of the Sun Industry Standard Source License. As a consequence, no future Sun open-source project will use the SISSL. Projects currently using the SISSL under a dual-license scheme, such as OpenOffice.org, are dropping the SISSL and thus simplifying their license scheme as soon as the development cycle allows. Effectie with the announcement that Sun is retiring the SISSL, OpenOffice.org will in the future only be licensed under the LGPL (.pdf). A FAQ is also available.
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It's all about IBM and its' Workplace Editors
by on Mon 5th Sep 2005 19:51 UTC

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None of the contributors have seemed to have got it yet. This is about one thing and one thing alone - IBM.

IBM has, under the SISSL license which allows binary only distribution of derivative works, forked OO to produce the IBM Editors for Workplace (the intended successor to Lotus Notes). This is a plugin for the Java based Workplace Rich Client Platform (RCP) which is basically the same as the open source Eclipse RCP released under the IBM Common Public License (CPL). It has not opened any of the code for the Workplace Editors (which are derived from OO) as under the SISSL it is not obliged to.

I think Sun is trying to force some of IBM's development of OO out into the open. Now with the release of OO 2 under the LGPL only, it will be obliged to open any OO code it modifies which is derived from any version of OO later than OO2Beta2. Personally I think it should release the OO derived IBM editors under the LGPL as a plugin for the Eclipse RCP, if it wishes to demonstrate its commitment to FOSS.

I don't know if IBM would like it but I think that Red Hat would be very interested in a OO based plugin for the Eclipse RCP. RH has developed a version of Eclipse that it distributes, which is compiled using GCJ as well as helping make the Java parts of OO 2 compilable with GCJ.

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If Sun chose to use the GPL instead of the SISSL or LGPL they wouldn't have this problem.

just pointing that out

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