Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 4th Oct 2007 15:34 UTC, submitted by te_lanus
SuSE, openSUSE OpenSUSE 10.3 has been released today. "This version contains new beautiful green artwork, KDE 3.5.7 and parts of KDE 4, SUSE-polished GNOME 2.20, a GTK version of YaST, a new 1-click-install technology, MP3 support out-of-the-box, new and redesigned YaST modules, compiz and compiz fusion advances, virtualisation improvements, OpenOffice.org 2.3, Xfce 4.4.1, and much more!"
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RE[3]: Great release!
by segedunum on Thu 4th Oct 2007 20:26 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Great release!"
segedunum
Member since:
2005-07-06

It's not illegal on patent grounds, it's illegal on copyright grounds, and Germany had a perfectly serviceable copyright regime last time I checked.

I'd love to know how they've covered that under copyright, because every single time this has come up in Germany (SanDisk for example) the issue of patents has been used. I was also greatly amused as to how someone from Sisvel got greatly worried about how the whole SanDisk debacle might invalidate patents they claim to hold.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Great release!
by AdamW on Thu 4th Oct 2007 20:54 in reply to "RE[3]: Great release!"
AdamW Member since:
2005-07-06

This is about win32-codecs, not MP3 playback. win32-codecs contains several Windows codecs (literally .dll files) ripped straight out of Windows Media Player, QuickTime etc.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[5]: Great release!
by segedunum on Fri 5th Oct 2007 10:13 in reply to "RE[4]: Great release!"
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

This is about win32-codecs, not MP3 playback.

I'd still love to know how they have MP3 covered in Germany though.

win32-codecs contains several Windows codecs (literally .dll files) ripped straight out of Windows Media Player, QuickTime etc.

They aren't really necessary. There is software around that will play these files without touching Windows components. It doesn't explain why some people seem to be getting excessively paranoid about licensing things. All people are doing is accessing their own files here. I don't see Open Office needing a license from Microsoft, nor should one be necessary.

Reply Parent Score: 1