Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 3rd Oct 2007 06:44 UTC
Amiga & AROS Bill McEwen of Amiga, Inc. writes in a public letter: "Over the last several months and in fact couple of years, Amiga has continued our software and business development and generally kept quiet. This path of quietness was chosen so that we communicated only when there was a development that culminated in a product that could be purchased. In recent weeks, our being quiet has been interpreted as weakness or an open invitation to attempt harming our business relationships and opportunities with partners and customers."
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RE[12]: Why?
by Downix on Sun 7th Oct 2007 17:20 UTC in reply to "RE[11]: Why?"
Downix
Member since:
2007-08-21

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"Even simple infinite loop with normal priority will almost completely block the NT/W2k. Even mouse cursor will move jerkily. Actually RESET button saved a lot of my nerves"

Okay, let’s examine why your statement is incorrect. First we will define the two common scenarios were the AmigaOS Exec’s scheduler can get in trouble:
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This arguement is off-topic and pointless in this case, as the Amiga's mouse system and NT's are two different beasties. The Amiga's will continue to run when the rest of the OS is locked up not due to some miraculous scheduler, but becaue of the custom hardware, which is what actually drives the mouse pointer. The chipset gave the Amiga this ability, not the OS.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[13]: Why?
by makfu on Sun 7th Oct 2007 21:23 in reply to "RE[12]: Why?"
makfu Member since:
2005-12-18

"This arguement is off-topic and pointless in this case, as the Amiga's mouse system and NT's are two different beasties. The Amiga's will continue to run when the rest of the OS is locked up not due to some miraculous scheduler, but becaue of the custom hardware, which is what actually drives the mouse pointer. The chipset gave the Amiga this ability, not the OS."

My point was about the effectiveness of the NT and Amiga schedulers and a direct reply to blatant unsubstantiated FUD regarding responsiveness. That I addressed why the cursor on an NT box (same is true for other OS’s on conventional PC hardware) can become “jumpy” was an addendum at the end of the post. The post was not about device interrupt handling or how the mouse cursor gets drawn to the screen.

Reply Parent Score: 1