Linked by Eugenia Loli on Fri 26th Oct 2007 05:34 UTC, submitted by WillM
Talk, Rumors, X Versus Y "Experts say that migrations from Unix to Linux have slowed down because all the low-hanging fruit has now been picked. Linux growth in the U.S. x86 server market has, over the past six quarters, started to falter and reverse its positive course relative to Windows Server and the market as a whole." More here.
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ssa2204
Member since:
2006-04-22

This article, sad to say is not exactly news. This has been reported in many other channels. You are looking for a conspiracy where none exists.

Anyone half in tune to the market would have told you that as businesses finished migrating to Linux from Unix, sales would slow down. What is so difficult to understand about this. My god, I was reading about this a year ago in an article about Novell.

And in a day when so many are quick to point to blogs and wikipedia, it is quite ridiculous to outright dismiss an article by Eweek simply because it reports something that doesn't mesh with how you want the world to work. I will leave it to someone else to explain exactly how much more wrong it would be if the report falsley claimed that Linux was growing at an outstanding rate when it actually was not.

The solution is not to revert to conspiracies, do you honestly think that companies like Red Hat or Novell are simply going to just chalk this up to some nefarious reasons, or are they simply going to work harder at marketing their product and improving customer relations and communications?

You know the old saying, if you can't take the heat, stay out of the kitchen really applies to this.

Reply Parent Score: 14

segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

My god, I was reading about this a year ago in an article about Novell.

In Novell's world, this has been going on for years, and years, and years. No, it isn't news at all. This is why Novell decided to get into the Linux world, as Netware had continued to decline, in order to bolster their market share and revenue, and given the fact that they just hadn't got the resources to push Netware to where it needed to be.

What have Novell done in the past four years with respect to the competition? Other than not actually compete with their competitors and sign a deal with said competitor that says "Pretty please, don't hurt us!", they have done absolutely nothing.

Reply Parent Score: 4

IanSVT Member since:
2005-07-06

What have Novell done in the past four years with respect to the competition? Other than not actually compete with their competitors and sign a deal with said competitor that says "Pretty please, don't hurt us!", they have done absolutely nothing.


Uh oh, here we go again! ;)

In the past four years, Novell has done the following:

-Ported NCP to linux
-Ported NSS to linux
-Ported eDirectory to linux(cross platform enabled to span over NetWare, Linux, and Windows)
-Ported GroupWise to linux(cross platform enabled to span over NetWare, Linux, and Windows)
-Built the next generation Zen platform on linux
-Ported NDPS/iPrint to linux
-Rebuilt part(server.exe) of NetWare to be virtual machine aware.
-Ported DNS/DHCP directory integrated services to linux.

That's just a snip-it. Has Novell done a good job selling their products? Clearly not. Can they do a better job with many facets of their business? Absolutely. Has Novell "done absolutely nothing" in the past four years? That is about as incorrect of a statement as you can make on the subject.

Edited 2007-10-26 12:58

Reply Parent Score: 8

Beta Member since:
2005-07-06

When Microsoft is involved, there is always a nefarious reason.
Please name one thing they have done honestly.

Reply Parent Score: 6

Lettherebemorelight Member since:
2005-07-11

This article, sad to say is not exactly news. This has been reported in many other channels. You are looking for a conspiracy where none exists.

That would be easier to swallow if the ad/article in question wasn't covered in MS ads. I don't think it is so much a conspiracy as it is MS just up to their old tricks of purchasing lip service.

Anyone half in tune to the market would have told you that as businesses finished migrating to Linux from Unix, sales would slow down. What is so difficult to understand about this.

You cant accurately determine the market share by sales of an OS, when you can get that OS for free. What is so difficult to understand about that?

Don't get me wrong...it is possible that Linux adoption could be slowing, but trying to convince IT people to take MS's word for it could very well be an exercise in futility.

Edited 2007-10-26 20:41

Reply Parent Score: 2

tomcat Member since:
2006-01-06

That would be easier to swallow if the ad/article in question wasn't covered in MS ads. I don't think it is so much a conspiracy as it is MS just up to their old tricks of purchasing lip service.


Look at it this way: Who is going to pay for Linux ads? Look, the original poster was correct. You're looking for dirty tricks when, in fact, unbridled over-optimism is the enemy here. People mistakenly thought that growth in the Linux market was coming at the expense of Microsoft; however, in fact, what's happened here is exactly what the article says: Shops running expensive proprietary Unix versions moved to lower-cost Linux distros. When this migration started to dry up, Linux adoption was bound to suffer.

You cant accurately determine the market share by sales of an OS, when you can get that OS for free. What is so difficult to understand about that?


The vast majority of organizations deploying Linux are commercial in nature and obtain their OS preinstalled when they purchase hardware; in addition, those same organizations are getting support contracts at the same time. This is reality. So, in fact while not perfect, hardware deployments track closely to OS market share. You may not like that, but it's true.

Don't get me wrong...it is possible that Linux adoption could be slowing, but trying to convince IT people to take MS's word for it could very well be an exercise in futility.


IT people don't need to take *anyone's* word for it. They know their own needs. Those needs are reflected in these latest sales statistics -- and they show that Linux deployments have reached a saturation point. The only way for them to continue growing is to move into markets which are currently dominated by Windows (CRM, etc).

Reply Parent Score: -1