Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 5th Nov 2007 23:14 UTC
Hardware, Embedded Systems There's absolutely no reason you should be waiting the three-plus minutes it takes your computer to boot up Windows, says Woody Hobbs, CEO of Phoenix Technologies. And indeed, if Hobbs has his way, you may not have to endure those waits much longer. Phoenix says its new technology, HyperSpace, will offer mobile PC users the ability to instantly fire up their most used apps - things like e-mail, web browsers and various media players - without using Windows, simply by pressing the F4 button.
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RE[3]: The point?
by rayiner on Tue 6th Nov 2007 02:12 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: The point?"
rayiner
Member since:
2005-07-06

Here's a newsflash for you: after using Windows for many years, but not allowing everything to run in the background (Check for updates for this app, etc. as well as all spyware or such) Windows doesn't degrade in a significant way, especially if you run the defragger once a month

Newsflash for you: all those provisos invalidate your point for 99% of users out there. Phoenix's technology might not bring any benefit to the 1% of people that can take care of a Windows machine, but that hardly matters to them.

Windows isn't nearly as bad as you'd like to imply: it all comes down to understanding and preventing all the crap that people typically install from getting stuck in the startup sequence.

Windows (as a platform --- the OS plus its apps) is bad because it requires that kind of TLC to perform well. The normal use-case is with an inexperienced user. If a product cannot cope with "expected wear and tear", it's flawed by design.

Windows apologists complaining about "stupid users" always strikes me as entertaining. "If users weren't stupid, Windows would be great!" It's like saying "If we didn't have gravity, designing airplanes would be easy!" Bitching about reality is pointless. Users are what they are and gravity is what it is. A product can only be judged by how well it functions in the context of reality (which can be a surprisingly hard concept for people to grasp). Yeah, designing products to accommodate reality is hard, but that's why engineers get paid the big bucks, right?

Edited 2007-11-06 02:14

Reply Parent Score: 15

RE[4]: The point?
by JonathanBThompson on Tue 6th Nov 2007 02:38 in reply to "RE[3]: The point?"
JonathanBThompson Member since:
2006-05-26

Do you honestly expect that Linux would fare any better if average users used it, where "average users" are the ones just as likely to install all that excess crap that they do?

The big reason Linux isn't nearly as likely to be loaded down with all those things to slow things down on bootup has absolutely nothing to do with the design and everything to do with the educational level of the user and their expectations: therefore, Linux is as flawed as Windows by design, but it's only the more typical Linux user that keeps that equally flawed design from becoming as blatant, that's all.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: The point?
by rayiner on Tue 6th Nov 2007 03:22 in reply to "RE[4]: The point?"
rayiner Member since:
2005-07-06

Do you honestly expect that Linux would fare any better if average users used it, where "average users" are the ones just as likely to install all that excess crap that they do?

Yes, I do. Linux software doesn't do all the nasty stuff Windows software does, so installing stuff randomly won't screw things up. Moreover, the platform itself is more secure (no ActiveX or silly things like that), so all the virus scanners and whatnot that slow down Windows machines are unnecessary.

Macs are largely the same way. When I switched my mom from a PC to a Mac, my "support incidents" went from a couple a month, to a couple a year. She hasn't gotten any better with computers in that time --- the system just better handles abuse at the hands of a novice user. No need to defrag, no need to update virus definition files, no need to run spyware and ad blockers, no need for preventative maintenance, etc. The only thing I have to do with that machine is run "Software Update" once every three or four months.

Now, as for who is to blame about the problems Windows has a platform, that's a matter of debate. Microsoft deserves a lot of blame for making such a complex system, and indeed, embracing a "culture of complexity" from bottom to top. At the same time, Windows application authors deserve a lot of blame, for well, being mean-spirited assholes who like to torture their users.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[5]: The point?
by jabbotts on Tue 6th Nov 2007 15:26 in reply to "RE[4]: The point?"
jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

"The big reason Linux isn't nearly as likely to be loaded down with all those things to slow things down on bootup has absolutely nothing to do with the design and everything to do with the educational level of the user and their expectations: therefore, Linux is as flawed as Windows by design, but it's only the more typical Linux user that keeps that equally flawed design from becoming as blatant, that's all."

... and distrobution maintainer's vetting of software before it's included into the repositories or install disks for use by "average users". Well, that and the differences in architectural design which limit the damage a user can do to the overall *nix system without intentionally becoming root.

It's not realy relevant though unless there is some way that "do you honestly expect Linux would fare any better" somehow relates to Phoenix's intentions to develop this solution.

Reply Parent Score: 2

v RE[4]: The point?
by tomcat on Tue 6th Nov 2007 02:44 in reply to "RE[3]: The point?"
RE[5]: The point?
by Nossie on Tue 6th Nov 2007 04:41 in reply to "RE[4]: The point?"
Nossie Member since:
2007-07-31

people are stupid.

You are stupid. I am stupid - we are all stupid in the context of things we know nothing about. Although you could suggest the guy could have said 'computer illiterate' instead.

Are you suggesting I'm going to lug my hibernating laptop round about with me all day and expect it to be fully charged when I open it? fast-forward 2030

I find that windows does indeed heavily slow down from normal use, registry filling up, files not automatically installed/removed correctly. Windows has never been able to optimise its application structure and all you really have to do with both XP and vista is install Office 2k7 and Adobe apps and you'll find your shiny new computer boots like treacle. Add Maya to that and your asking for trouble.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: The point?
by Nossie on Tue 6th Nov 2007 04:42 in reply to "RE[4]: The point?"
Nossie Member since:
2007-07-31

I might also suggest that, that is **If** your computer returns from hibernation and doesnt spaz like the majority of them.

Reply Parent Score: 1