Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 18th Nov 2007 15:46 UTC
Graphics, User Interfaces This is the sixth article in a series on common usability and graphical user interface related terms [part I | part II | part III | part IV | part V]. On the internet, and especially in forum discussions like we all have here on OSNews, it is almost certain that in any given discussion, someone will most likely bring up usability and GUI related terms - things like spatial memory, widgets, consistency, Fitts' Law, and more. The aim of this series is to explain these terms, learn something about their origins, and finally rate their importance in the field of usability and (graphical) user interface design. In part VI, we focus on the dock.
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RE: Dock vs. Launcher
by Thom_Holwerda on Sun 18th Nov 2007 16:14 UTC in reply to "Dock vs. Launcher"
Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

It shows running applications too.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Dock vs. Launcher
by PowerMacX on Mon 19th Nov 2007 18:44 in reply to "RE: Dock vs. Launcher"
PowerMacX Member since:
2005-11-06

OK, so then:

1. I click an app in the RISC OS dock, and it opens
2. I click on another app in the dock, and that one opens
3. I click back in the first icon and it switches to the first app (instead of launching another instance)
4. I open an app by some other means, and it appears in the dock as you confirmed
5. I close said app and it disappears from the dock
6. I can add non-running apps to the dock

Are all of those assertions true? Because that is not completely clear from the article or the wikipedia page. I guess I'll have to try the emulator to find out for sure ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Dock vs. Launcher
by ChrisG on Tue 20th Nov 2007 09:08 in reply to "RE[2]: Dock vs. Launcher"
ChrisG Member since:
2005-07-09

1. I click an app in the RISC OS dock, and it opens
yes - and an icon for the running app appears on the right hand side of the iconbar.

2. I click on another app in the dock, and that one opens
yes - and its "running" icon appears on the right hand side of the iconbar.

3. I click back in the first icon and it switches to the first app (instead of launching another instance)
Not exactly. It would open a second instance of the application. To access the already running instance, you would use the right-hand icon. some applications would only allow you to run one instance of themselves at a time of course.

4. I open an app by some other means, and it appears in the dock as you confirmed
Yes - as another instance on the right hand side.

5. I close said app and it disappears from the dock
The right hand icon would disappear. The launcher icon you mentioned in (1) would remain.

6. I can add non-running apps to the dock
Yes.

It should also be noted that the iconbar supports full drag and drop (both to and from the bar). For instance, dragging a file to an app icon (either a launcher or a running app) on the bar would launch that app and open the file.

The iconbar was one of the huge strengths of RISC OS in my opinion - and it was a lot clearer what each icon weas for than it is on OSX, because of the seperation of left and right - launchers were on the left (disks, applications), and running apps were on the right. The two icons on the far right were always there and were for OS settings.

Reply Parent Score: 1