Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 19th Nov 2007 21:16 UTC, submitted by Wyatt Lyon Preul
.NET (dotGNU too) Scott Guthrie has announced that Visual Studio 2008 and .NET 3.5 are now available for download and provides a tour of some of the new features. "Visual Studio 2008 and .NET 3.5 contain a ton of new functionality and improvements. Below are links to blog posts I've done myself as well as links to videos you can watch to learn more about it."
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RE[3]: Looks fantastic
by segedunum on Mon 19th Nov 2007 23:25 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Looks fantastic"
segedunum
Member since:
2005-07-06

He was talking about the CSS & Javascript intellisense, but I have a feeling you knew that anyway.

All the poster mentioned was CSS and JavaScript support, and quite frankly, Internet Explorer, Microsoft's development tools and proper, standard support of ECMA(Java)Script and Cascading Style Sheets are absolute polar opposites.

The hint of irony and sarcasm was absolutely spot on, and pretty well done.

Quite frankly, I'm distinctly underwhelmed by yet another new version of .Net that no normal person can keep up with. Microsoft simply have too many MSDN lunatics producing too many development tools no sane person can keep up with.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Looks fantastic
by modmans2ndcoming on Mon 19th Nov 2007 23:51 in reply to "RE[3]: Looks fantastic"
modmans2ndcoming Member since:
2005-11-09

I wonder if there is a way to develop a web browser that has a plug in architecture for the CSS. That would allow CSS to improve asynchronous to IE releases, or any browser release... and if it was an Open Source project, we might see some significant improvements in support all together.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Looks fantastic
by computrius on Wed 21st Nov 2007 00:07 in reply to "RE[4]: Looks fantastic"
computrius Member since:
2006-03-26

So many people would have so many different versions of plugins installed that you'd go nuts trying to write anything that worked for anyone.

And no, I doubt it. Open source is not the magical solution to all problems, no matter what some would like you to think.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Looks fantastic
by WorknMan on Mon 19th Nov 2007 23:54 in reply to "RE[3]: Looks fantastic"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Quite frankly, I'm distinctly underwhelmed by yet another new version of .Net that no normal person can keep up with. Microsoft simply have too many MSDN lunatics producing too many development tools no sane person can keep up with.

Haha, so true. I recall listening to an episode of the .NET Rocks podcast recently, and they were talking about how it used to be possible (like back in the early days) for a person to know pretty much everything there was to know about a PC.
But now days, it's getting pretty much impossible just to keep track of everything in the .NET Framework itself. Makes me wonder if the people coding the .NET Framework ever sleep ;)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Looks fantastic
by gonzo on Tue 20th Nov 2007 00:04 in reply to "RE[4]: Looks fantastic"
gonzo Member since:
2005-11-10

But now days, it's getting pretty much impossible just to keep track of everything in the .NET Framework itself. Makes me wonder if the people coding the .NET Framework ever sleep ;)

You specialize in certain areas and that's it (for example, ASP.NET). For other stuff you use MSDN/Help. You don't get to claim you're an expert on everything.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[5]: Looks fantastic
by jayson.knight on Tue 20th Nov 2007 13:09 in reply to "RE[4]: Looks fantastic"
jayson.knight Member since:
2005-07-06

"But now days, it's getting pretty much impossible just to keep track of everything in the .NET Framework itself."

The key to any software developer's job is knowing how to read documentation, and knowing where to look for said documentation. The rest comes with experience. I've been a professional .Net dev for 6 years now, and still run into new BCL classes on a weekly basis.

Concepts are always the most important part of the job, followed very closely by the tools you use.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Looks fantastic
by neozeed on Tue 20th Nov 2007 00:06 in reply to "RE[3]: Looks fantastic"
neozeed Member since:
2006-03-03

Quite frankly, I'm distinctly underwhelmed by yet another new version of .Net that no normal person can keep up with. Microsoft simply have too many MSDN lunatics producing too many development tools no sane person can keep up with.


Huh? Where have you been? It's about frameworks & developers. Windows has been a platform that people *WANT* to program for, because Microsoft is constantly going out of their way to come up with better ways to solve business problems.

Would you rather have a K&R compiler, and a VT220? Oh sure it'd be easier, but is it realistic in 2007?

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[5]: Looks fantastic
by modmans2ndcoming on Tue 20th Nov 2007 01:20 in reply to "RE[4]: Looks fantastic"
modmans2ndcoming Member since:
2005-11-09

I agree... with out the extensive framework, implementing solutions would take a lot longer and be a lot buggier.

yeah, sometimes it is not "real" development because you are simply using tools that do the heavy lifting, but so what? is a carpenter not a real carpenter unless he/she uses a hand saw and a traditional hammer rather than a power saw and a nail gun?

Yeah, the framework is huge, but isn't that what MSDN is for? If you do not know how to do something, look it up.. you think doctors... even specialists can keep it all in their head?

the split between windows and Open Source has already lead to a specialist split. .Net will probably lead to a few more specializes... just like a rough carpenter specializes in getting the frame of a structure up fast and efficiently and a finishing carpenter focuses on putting up the trim and other small carpentry jobs, you will see specialties in development work. Sure, either carpenter can do teh work of their counterpart, but they can't do it as well or efficiently, so is true today with open source and .Net developers.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[4]: Looks fantastic
by google_ninja on Tue 20th Nov 2007 03:50 in reply to "RE[3]: Looks fantastic"
google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

All the poster mentioned was CSS and JavaScript support, and quite frankly, Internet Explorer, Microsoft's development tools and proper, standard support of ECMA(Java)Script and Cascading Style Sheets are absolute polar opposites.


Microsofts support of javascript is worse then mozilla, but better then anything else. And as of IE7, their CSS support is pretty much where everyone else is

Quite frankly, I'm distinctly underwhelmed by yet another new version of .Net that no normal person can keep up with. Microsoft simply have too many MSDN lunatics producing too many development tools no sane person can keep up with.


Anyone with half a brain can keep up with it, the last release was 3 years ago.

Edited 2007-11-20 03:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[5]: Looks fantastic
by segedunum on Tue 20th Nov 2007 10:40 in reply to "RE[4]: Looks fantastic"
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

Microsofts support of javascript is worse then mozilla, but better then anything else. And as of IE7, their CSS support is pretty much where everyone else is

Simply not true. Their JavaScript support has always diverged wildly, and the CSS support in IE7 solves none of the incompatibilities. CSS3 is simply not going to happen, and there are still parts of CSS2 that haven't been fixed.

Anyone with half a brain can keep up with it, the last release was 3 years ago.

Worrying about five different versions of .Net to target, with more on the way presumably, is not solving anyone's problems.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Looks fantastic
by sappyvcv on Tue 20th Nov 2007 16:14 in reply to "RE[4]: Looks fantastic"
sappyvcv Member since:
2005-07-06

Sorry but IE7's javascript and css is still behind both Mozilla and Opera and probably webkit/khtml at this point too (CSS support at least, not sure about JS).

Reply Parent Score: 2