Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 16:59 UTC, submitted by Oliver
BSD and Darwin derivatives "DesktopBSD 1.6RC3 for AMD64 is now available for download via BitTorrent and from our mirror sites. It includes several improvements made since the release of 1.6RC3 for i386, including: better performance by disabling SMP on single core/processor computers, fixed installation on disks with special partition names, inclusion of the FreeBSD ports collection on the DVD, and more."
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Good news
by tankist on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 20:57 UTC
tankist
Member since:
2007-01-19

I wish DesktopBSD get more attention and development resources. PC BSD is getting all the hype, but it looks that DesktopBSD approach of staying with FreeBSD ports/packages technically is more sound than alien PBIs. If PC BSD community devoted their attention to creating standard packages instead of PBIs it would make more sense, I think.

All in all, more competition for FreeBSD on desktop will benefit everyone.

Reply Score: 9

RE: Good news
by Joe User on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 22:57 in reply to "Good news"
Joe User Member since:
2005-06-29

"it looks that DesktopBSD approach of staying with FreeBSD ports/packages technically"

Then if there's close to no difference with the upstream vendor, what's the point? Why not using FreeBSD itself? If it's just a matter of installing KDE and a few applications, I can do that in a few minutes.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Good news
by Daniel Seuffert on Thu 22nd Nov 2007 23:32 in reply to "RE: Good news"
Daniel Seuffert Member since:
2005-08-02

Sorry but you didn't got the point. DesktopBSD as well as PC-BSD are aimed to ease installation, configuration and updating (and some other things) of FreeBSD for new users not experts like you.

Some of the users might want to use DesktopBSD/PC-BSD forever, some want to explore the beauty of FreeBSD itself, some want to switch to another BSD or $whatever.

DesktopBSD-tools are available via Ports or packages and you can transform a FreeBSD installation into a DesktopBSD or vice versa. If you haven't noticed please check http://www.freshports.org/sysutils/desktopbsd-tools/

Apple has tremendous success with Mac OS X because people with hardly no UNIX/BSD experience can use it in a minute. Please tell me what's wrong with the same approach in FreeBSD itself?

You want a better FreeBSD? You need people, code, money, bandwith, hardware etc. You want that resources from people not using FreeBSD? Hardly possible.
If you want more resources you need to gain more FreeBSD users. In the long run they will be the only ones to support FreeBSD. And exactly you will benefit from more FreeBSD-users once DesktopBSD and PC-BSD have gained more popularity even if you don't use it. Most of the users of DesktopBSD and PC-BSD will simply use it but some of them will contribute with money, hardware, bandwith, mirrors, artwork, guidance for newbies and even code once they are experts in some way.

This is the beauty of BSD and we want to share it with anybody out there.

May DesktopBSD and PC-BSD prosper and get better day to day as well as its mother FreeBSD.

Daniel on behalf of DesktopBSD

Reply Parent Score: 14

RE: Good news
by Aaron1 on Fri 23rd Nov 2007 03:00 in reply to "Good news"
Aaron1 Member since:
2006-01-19

I maybe wrong here but I think PC-BSD still includes the ports system if you want to use it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Good news
by Doc Pain on Fri 23rd Nov 2007 03:11 in reply to "RE: Good news"
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

"I maybe wrong here but I think PC-BSD still includes the ports system if you want to use it."

In fact, PC-BSD, as well as DesktopBSD, contain both facilities for using precompiled packages and the ports collection. Please pay attention that using them with PC-BSD is possible, but not recommended unless you're exactly knowing what you do, because it may interfere with the PBI system.

So, on a PC-BSD and a DesktopBSD system, you can

# pkg_add -r xmms

to install from a precompiled package, wich will install the dependencies if required, or

# cd /usr/ports/multimedia/mplayer
# make install

to compile and install from a ports entry.

Compiling things from the ports is needed only if you want to run bleeding edge software or if you are required to set configuration flags at compile time (e. g. codes to use by mplayer, or recompile X to make a tree button mouse work properly). In most cases, pkg_add is what you want.

You can use the portupgrade frontends (portinstall, portupgrade, pkgdb) to make extended use of the ports system and have a both ports and packages aware database maintained automatically (pkgdb -aF).

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: Good news
by tankist on Fri 23rd Nov 2007 18:25 in reply to "RE: Good news"
tankist Member since:
2007-01-19

If you browse the PC BSD forums you'll see numerous complains about problems after installing software using port/packages. It looks that PBIs are not that compatible with the standard FreeBSD way of installing software.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Good news
by vermaden on Fri 23rd Nov 2007 06:34 in reply to "Good news"
vermaden Member since:
2006-11-18

Currently DesktopBSD is generally considered as a less known (or even worse) competitor to PC-BSD, DesktopBSD is only considered as a 'same as PC-BSD' but packages are installed in diffrent way.

The good road forDesktopBSD will be abandon KDE and offer Gnome AND Xfce to choose after isntallation (focus on GTK2 desktop), this along with their tools would be a TRUE alternative to PC-BSD and people would have an alternative to PC-BSD which is bundled with KDE.

I would really want to see that change.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Good news
by Doc Pain on Fri 23rd Nov 2007 07:00 in reply to "RE: Good news"
Doc Pain Member since:
2006-10-08

"Currently DesktopBSD is generally considered as a less known (or even worse) competitor to PC-BSD, DesktopBSD is only considered as a 'same as PC-BSD' but packages are installed in diffrent way."

Sadly, this is what I'd say when I get asket about what's the difference between DesktopBSD and PC-BSD. But in other words, DesktopBSD is more "hand in hand with" the underlying FreeBSD OS because it does not introduce a new kind of package installers, along with new directories rooted in / that contain the PBI content.

"The good road forDesktopBSD will be abandon KDE and offer Gnome AND Xfce to choose after isntallation (focus on GTK2 desktop), this along with their tools would be a TRUE alternative to PC-BSD and people would have an alternative to PC-BSD which is bundled with KDE."

I would really honour this change. I'm tired of KDE already. Please don't get me wrong: KDE is a fine thing for newbies and average home users, but it is definitely not designed for me. After installing PC-BSD, my first move would be to deinstall nearly everything because I do not use any KDE application. Gnome, on the other hand, provides a desktop system that appeals a bit more to me, but still, I like XFCE and WindowMaker a lot. For those who prefer a manually tailored BSD system, "plain" FreeBSD would be the better choice, I think; this provides a way to have only those software installed that you really really want, and not what others think you will need. Integration of the underlying OS into the setup mechanisms of Gnome would be a rewarding task, so you don't need to rely on KDE setup tools only if you feel you need GUI tools to administer your system.

And please, re-read the paragraph above: I don't want to start a flame war KDE vs. Gnome or say "KDE is for dummies". It's just not for me, honestly. :-)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Good news
by Daniel Seuffert on Fri 23rd Nov 2007 12:32 in reply to "RE: Good news"
Daniel Seuffert Member since:
2005-08-02

Completely rewrite all the Qt-tools in gtk? For what please? You want DesktopBSD to throw away years of work for exactly no gain in efficiency, features etc.? Uh, we will have a lot more users when we proudly announce it on our website... And which Newbie knows the difference between gtk and Qt? You don't think the same amount of work would be better spent improving the existing work in Qt? Please think twice.

Please stop those useless discussions. Exactly nobody of the targeted audience cares about things like KDE vs. Gnome or gtk vs. Qt.

Ask an Apple user if he knows the diffrence between PPC or Intel or the difference between a Mach kernel or a BSD kernel. He will tell you he has an computer and he wants to browse, mail etc. Get the message please.

And if you like Gnome or XFCE that much you can easily install it via Ports, packages oder .pbi in PC-BSD (don't know if there are pbi for it).

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Good news
by justin.68 on Fri 23rd Nov 2007 12:47 in reply to "RE: Good news"
justin.68 Member since:
2006-09-16

Why on earth abandon KDE? I think the option of choosing an alternative desktop to KDE would be better than ditching it altogether. I'd never want to see a *BSD OS shipping just with GNOME.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Good news
by bradley on Fri 23rd Nov 2007 15:02 in reply to "RE: Good news"
bradley Member since:
2007-03-02

I think that this is a good idea for DesktopBSD to office the Gnome environment, while PC-BSD offers the KDE environment since these two are aimed primarily for new users to experience BSD. Personally... this would bring them both more exposure to the masses.

Reply Parent Score: 0

RE: Good news
by cmost on Fri 23rd Nov 2007 14:18 in reply to "Good news"
cmost Member since:
2006-07-16

I disagree completely. PC-BSD is doing something unique by offering PBI's. These, much like Windows' EXE files, offer a painless method for newbies to install packages. The ports system is still available for those wishing to do things the in a more traditional BSD way. It boggles me why people are so quick to attack simplified methods of installing software? Linspire Linux was also ridiculed when its distribution began touting "Click-n-run" as an alternative to Debian's more traditional apt (and Synaptic.) Change is not bad. Repeat as necessary.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Good news
by joekiser on Fri 23rd Nov 2007 18:25 in reply to "RE: Good news"
joekiser Member since:
2005-06-30

Another benefit of the PBI system, for those of us with limited internet access, is that you are downloading ONE file as opposed to several dependencies for your program to work. I've used FreeBSD since 1998, but given my current location, internet access isn't always a given and thus ports/packages aren't always available. Downloading a single file with an installer has helped tremendously. Now if only there was an option to view the install script before actually installing...

Reply Parent Score: 2