Linked by Eugenia Loli on Fri 7th Dec 2007 06:34 UTC
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu "Many people are looking to Ubuntu to be something that it is not: A mass market ready operating system designed to work with the same level of compatibility as Microsoft Windows. Where people get confused is in believing that if Ubuntu, king of the Linux distros, is not able to take the marketplace by storm, then something must be broken with desktop Linux. In this article, I'll explain what it will take to dethrone the mighty Ubuntu and gain a market share so large that it will eclipse anything seen by Ubuntu to date." More here.
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RE: Linux on the Desktop
by Xaero_Vincent on Fri 7th Dec 2007 08:05 UTC in reply to "Linux on the Desktop"
Xaero_Vincent
Member since:
2006-08-18

I think the main problem with Linux is software. It has very few apps to claim exclusive ownership.

Windows has access to nearly all of the software available to the Linux platform in addition to the big name commercial apps.

Can Linux claim the same? Wine works well with some apps but not all. The only sure way is through virtualization, which is the same as just running Windows but as a second class citizen and vnc or terminal server. None of the latter solutions offer anything for 3D apps (as in gaming or 3d modeling)without spending big bucks.

Linux needs more developers and exclusive/killer apps that cannot so easily be ported to Windows. In the mean time it needs flawless interopability with the vast selection of commercial apps on Windows.

Edited 2007-12-07 08:09

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Linux on the Desktop
by Clinton on Fri 7th Dec 2007 08:58 in reply to "RE: Linux on the Desktop"
Clinton Member since:
2005-07-05

Linux has killer apps, but they aren't things most Windows users want to use. For me, BASH is a killer app and Windows lack of it is one of the biggest reasons I don't use Windows (Cygwin tries to compensate, but it really isn't ideal).

Also, Open Source software isn't about locking programs in to one platform like Microsoft does; which is what has made Linux a better platform than Windows is. Open Source is about freedom and giving the user the ability to make a program work how he/she wants it to work and on their preferred platform.

I don't think Windows users appreciate the huge benefit they have reaped from Open Source ideals and efforts.

Finally, I don't hear Linux users talking about whether or not Linux is ready for the desktop. We all know it is because we've used it as a desktop for years. It's the people who are sick of Windows and want a replacement that keep bringing the issue up.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[3]: Linux on the Desktop
by flanque on Fri 7th Dec 2007 09:46 in reply to "RE[2]: Linux on the Desktop"
flanque Member since:
2005-12-15

Nobody but techs, boffins and tinkers will care about bash.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Linux on the Desktop
by merde on Fri 7th Dec 2007 20:17 in reply to "RE: Linux on the Desktop"
merde Member since:
2007-04-05

But it's not a problem. If you get used to THE SAME software on both platforms, it would be easier to switch to Linux exclusively. Thunderbird, Firefox, OpenOffice, Gimp - I use it every day on both platforms and that suits me just fine.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Xaero_Vincent Member since:
2006-08-18

But it's not a problem. If you get used to THE SAME software on both platforms, it would be easier to switch to Linux exclusively. Thunderbird, Firefox, OpenOffice, Gimp - I use it every day on both platforms and that suits me just fine.


If that were true Linux would be more popular right now. Unfortuantly, marketshare speaks for itself.

What actually happens is some people embrace the open source offerings on their existing platforms and dont bother to try Linux. This is completely appropriate to the ideals of open source but offers no incentive for Linux adoption and therefore no incentive for 3rd party developers.

People are smart enough to relize that it would serve them little purpose to migrate to a different OS and be forced to learn all of it's querks/differences, just to have the same apps they have been using before on Windows, yet no access to those "other" apps--also used.

If Linux is ever going to be anything but an alternative for those who hate Microsoft then a movement needs to form that is soley dedicated to Linux/Unix and develop exclusive apps to showcase.

Edited 2007-12-07 21:50

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Linux on the Desktop
by wirespot on Sat 8th Dec 2007 06:25 in reply to "RE: Linux on the Desktop"
wirespot Member since:
2006-06-21

The only sure way is through virtualization, which is the same as just running Windows but as a second class citizen and vnc or terminal server. None of the latter solutions offer anything for 3D apps (as in gaming or 3d modeling)without spending big bucks.


"Big bucks"? Where did you get that? You can get VMWare or Cedega for very reasonable prices. They have a lot of 3D features and drivers. And you will get them at some point in Wine and QEMU, for free. But work advances slowly because there's a lot of reverse engineering to do.

And I don't think you're really up to how good virtualization and emulation has become these days. Kernel support has made it so Windows XP running under QEMU on Linux is undetectable from it running natively, in terms of speed and features. I no longer boot Windows unless I want to play a game that won't run otherwise. For everything else I run "qemu -hda /dev/hda7 -kernel-kqemu" and up pops the Windows XP installation in a window on my Linux desktop. Complete with USB devices, sound, file sharing between the virtual machine and the real machine, and of course networking. Yes, the actual Windows installation, on a different partition, not a virtual image.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Xaero_Vincent Member since:
2006-08-18

I know how "good" virtualization is but it still wont play my games unless I move to the Mac platform and use Parallels or Fusion. There isn't anything equivalent for Linux yet, nor are there any 3D remote desktop solutions that are reasonable prized--I think Citrix is working on one but just imagine how expensive that will be for a home user.

Edited 2007-12-08 08:12

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Linux on the Desktop
by walterbyrd on Sat 8th Dec 2007 14:24 in reply to "RE: Linux on the Desktop"
walterbyrd Member since:
2005-12-31

Linux needs more developers and exclusive/killer apps that cannot so easily be ported to Windows.

But doesn't that conflict with the open source philosophy? Practically all the popular applications for Linux are F/OSS. And being f/oss means they can be fairly easily ported to Windows.

This situation makes it virtually impossible for Linux to ever catch up to windows in terms of applications.

As far as I can see, the only thing that could change the situation is browser based apps.

Reply Parent Score: 2