Linked by Eugenia Loli on Fri 7th Dec 2007 06:25 UTC, submitted by poundsmack
Qt Jambi ships as a single Java library, or JAR (Java Archive) file, plus a handful of tools, including an interface layout and design tool, and an Eclipse plug-in. Trolltech uses its vaunted Qt C++ library as the GUI engine and puts Java wrappers around it. This approach uses the JNI (Java Native Interface) to call the necessary functions from Java. More here.
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RE[2]: Unconvinced
by evangs on Fri 7th Dec 2007 11:18 UTC in reply to "RE: Unconvinced"
evangs
Member since:
2005-07-07

But you are using C++, right? The question is whether the productivity boosts that come with Qt-Jambi transfer to Java which already has GUI toolkits that appear to be similar.

I have no doubt that Qt is better than any C++ GUI toolkit (like wxWidgets, MFC or some other obscure toolkit). As I've said, just looking at the line count from the examples that come with Qt-Jambi, what jumps out at me is how similar the code looks to Swing.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Unconvinced
by segedunum on Fri 7th Dec 2007 20:07 in reply to "RE[2]: Unconvinced"
segedunum Member since:
2005-07-06

But you are using C++, right? The question is whether the productivity boosts that come with Qt-Jambi transfer to Java which already has GUI toolkits that appear to be similar.

The reason why Trolltech thinks there will be a market for Jambi, particularly from the GUI point of view because Qt is a lot more than GUI libraries, is because Swing and SWT are crap - quite frankly.

Sun still haven't sorted out Swing over the last ten years, and the code and development required for it is like swallowing a large breeze block as well as not fitting into the desktop environment right - even with Gnome!

SWT took the direction of reimplementing itself natively on every platform - Win32, GTK and Mac. The problem with this can be seen very clearly when you view the bugs list in Eclipse and SWT that a handful of IBM developers are going red in the face trying to squash. Bugs that don't appear on Win32 but appear in GTK and Mac, and obscure bugs that mean that cross-platform apps aren't very cross-platform at all. They also don't integrate very well with the desktop either.

Certainly from a GUI point of view, Qt is light-years ahead of just about anything, but particularly in the Java world.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[4]: Unconvinced
by leos on Fri 7th Dec 2007 20:18 in reply to "RE[3]: Unconvinced"
leos Member since:
2005-09-21

Bugs that don't appear on Win32 but appear in GTK and Mac, and obscure bugs that mean that cross-platform apps aren't very cross-platform at all.


To be fair, any cross-platform toolkit is going to have some of these problems. You can't guarantee 100% that a certain OS at a certain patch level won't cause bugs in something as complex as a cross platform GUI toolkit.
That said, all my Qt apps are built for clients running Windows, and yet I do all my development on Linux. Then, when I'm ready to do a release, I reboot into windows, recompile (qmake, nmake release), and create the Windows version. So far I haven't had any bugs on Windows that weren't already identified on Linux.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Unconvinced
by mikeurbandz on Fri 7th Dec 2007 20:18 in reply to "RE[3]: Unconvinced"
mikeurbandz Member since:
2007-10-29

> The reason why Trolltech thinks there will be a
> market for Jambi, particularly from the GUI point
> of view because Qt is a lot more than GUI libraries,
> is because Swing and SWT are crap - quite frankly.

Well, Swing is not crap. It does lack some advanced widgets. But, there are third party component libraries (both open source and commercial) that make up for that. And the commercial ones are significantly cheaper than Qt is.

> well as not fitting into the desktop environment
> right - even with Gnome!

You haven't seen a Java 6 app running on GNOME recently have you? I'd be willing to bet you can't tell the difference between a well written Swing app on GNOME and a native GTK app on GNOME. The last two updates to Java 6 have made the GNOME support extremely good in Java.

And as I said, the latest version of Java Swing looks and feels more native on Windows than the latest version of Qt does. It also looks and feels more native on GNOME than the latest version of Qt does, even with GNOME's attempts at skinning a Qt app to look like a GNOME app.

Reply Parent Score: 3